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  • How much water?

    Richard Siemens/University of Alberta

    In what sounds like a chapter from Journey to the Center of the Earth, the chemical makeup of a tiny, extremely rare gemstone has made researchers think there's a massive water reservoir hundreds of miles under the earth.


    The gemstone in question is called ringwoodite, which is created when olivine, a material that is extremely common in the mantle, is highly pressurized; when it’s exposed to less pressurized environments, it reverts into olivine. It has previously been seen in meteorites and created in a laboratory, but until now it had never been found in a sample of the earth’s mantle.


    Diamond expert Graham Pearson of the University of Alberta came across a seemingly worthless, three-millimeter piece of brown diamond that had been found in Mato Grosso, Brazil, while he was researching another type of mineral. Within that diamond, he and his team found ringwoodite—and they found that roughly 1.5 percent of the ringwoodite’s weight was made up of trapped water. The findings are published in Nature.


    That water had to get in there somehow, and using analyses of its depth and its water makeup, Pearson suggests that there's water deep under the earth's surface—a lot of it.


    The finding “confirms predictions from high-pressure laboratory experiments that a water reservoir comparable in size to all the oceans combined is hidden deep in Earth’s mantle,” according to an analysis of Pearson’s findings by Hans Keppler of the University of Bayreuth in Germany.


    The earth’s crust, including the deepest parts of the oceans, reach depths of roughly 100 kilometers. From there, the upper mantle takes up about another 300 kilometers. Between there and the lower mantle is where this piece of ringwoodite was originally from—an area between 410 and 660 kilometers beneath the earth’s surface known as the “transition zone.”


    Scientists have long been divided about what, exactly, is in the transition zone. We’ve known that much of the upper mantle is made up of olivine, and as Keppler said, scientists have long thought that Earth contained reservoirs of water deep beneath the crust. But they weren’t sure whether the water existed as low as the transition zone—the area between the upper and lower mantles. While some say that much of the oceans’ water may have originated there, others have said it is likely completely dry.
    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

  • #2
    Re: How much water?

    Gen 8:2 The fountains also of the deep and the windows of heaven were stopped, and the rain from heaven was restrained;

    So with time science will discover what the Bible knew all along.

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    • #3
      Re: How much water?

      This article, written in 2007, describes what is called the Beijing Anomoly. Here's the first paragraph:

      The Beijing anomaly

      Deep underneath Asia, the presence of a massive body of water has recently been inferred, between about 700 and 1,400 km below the surface (roughly in the middle of the mantle).1 This massive ‘seismic anomaly’, a segment of the mantle that attenuates seismic waves from earthquakes, was revealed by analyzing some 600,000 seismograms (graphic recordings of shock waves traveling through the interior of the planet). According to the discoverers (M.E. Wysession and J. Lawrence) the volume of water in this anomaly is at least that of the Arctic Ocean.

      Here's the rest of the article:

      http://creation.com/water-inside-fire

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      • #4
        Re: How much water?

        Isn't one of the objections to the Genesis flood the problem with there not being enough water to cover the entire earth? Sounds like that objection is full of 'leaks' now. No longer holds any water?

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        • #5
          Re: How much water?

          Originally posted by Jake View Post
          Isn't one of the objections to the Genesis flood the problem with there not being enough water to cover the entire earth? Sounds like that objection is full of 'leaks' now. No longer holds any water?
          LOL. Even Jacques Cousteau admitted years ago that if you were to level out all the mountains and fill the ocean trenches there would be enough water on the surface right now to cover the earth to a depth of something like 10,000 feet. Few people realise that the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean is over a mile deeper than Mt. Everest is high.

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          • #6
            Re: How much water?

            Originally posted by Jeanne57 View Post
            LOL. Even Jacques Cousteau admitted years ago that if you were to level out all the mountains and fill the ocean trenches there would be enough water on the surface right now to cover the earth to a depth of something like 10,000 feet. Few people realise that the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean is over a mile deeper than Mt. Everest is high.
            Interesting and very plausible.

            The article in the OP states they don't know where else the water in the tiny little rock came from. The trace amount found was not H20, which is liquid water, but there was only one hydrogen and oxygen and this can already be found in rocks. I'm not sure it proves the existence of a vast amount of underground water.

            The article just came out so it will be interesting what other "experts" say on the matter. Even though we both know the flood happened and water filled the earth regardless.

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            • #7
              Re: How much water?

              Originally posted by Jake View Post
              Interesting and very plausible.

              The article in the OP states they don't know where else the water in the tiny little rock came from. The trace amount found was not H20, which is liquid water, but there was only one hydrogen and oxygen and this can already be found in rocks. I'm not sure it proves the existence of a vast amount of underground water.

              The article just came out so it will be interesting what other "experts" say on the matter. Even though we both know the flood happened and water filled the earth regardless.
              If you read the article I posted, it says where the water probably came from. And, as I said, that article is already 7 years old.

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              • #8
                Re: How much water?

                Man, if we could find a way to tap into that water... could solve some problems in many parts of the world.
                Matt 9:13
                13 "But go and learn what this means: ' I DESIRE COMPASSION,AND NOT SACRIFICE,' for I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners."
                NASU

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                • #9
                  Re: How much water?

                  Originally posted by Brother Mark View Post
                  Man, if we could find a way to tap into that water... could solve some problems in many parts of the world.
                  Probably easier to try and capture and mine a comet.
                  Do not say, “Why were the old days better than these?” For it is not wise to ask such questions.
                  Ecc 7:10

                  John777 exists to me only in quoted form.


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                  • #10
                    Re: How much water?

                    Originally posted by teddyv View Post
                    Probably easier to try and capture and mine a comet.
                    A man can dream, can't he!
                    Matt 9:13
                    13 "But go and learn what this means: ' I DESIRE COMPASSION,AND NOT SACRIFICE,' for I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners."
                    NASU

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: How much water?

                      Originally posted by Brother Mark View Post
                      A man can dream, can't he!
                      Absolutely! BTW, have not seen you around for awhile. Hope you are well.
                      Do not say, “Why were the old days better than these?” For it is not wise to ask such questions.
                      Ecc 7:10

                      John777 exists to me only in quoted form.


                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: How much water?

                        Originally posted by Brother Mark View Post
                        A man can dream, can't he!
                        Actually, I wish we could find a way to capture all the rain coming down in flooded areas and transport it to drought-stricken areas. Anybody who came up with a plan to do that would be an instant billionaire!

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