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  • Foxes Book Of Martyrs

    Hopefully this thread will be a reminder for those of us that haven't suffered severe persecution. The rapture doctrine was I believe created to confuse and deceive. Christians in todays world think they are going to escape the soon to come tribulation. A new "Dark Ages" will soon cover our planet and when it does many will leave the faith and go back into the world. Foxes Book will be quite the eye opener for anyone that hasn't read it and it is my sincere hope that in the reading it will strengthen many a Christians faith.

    Jude
    A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

    ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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  • #2
    I own this book. Definitely worth getting.
    As for pre-trib rapture...I don't believe it was created to "deceive" anyone. It's a sincere belief based on interpretation of certain scripture...just as post-trib is. I, myself, used to subscribe to it...Through my beliefs in this matter have been thrown in the air as of late. For now, I can't say I believe one way or the other. So I suppose you could say that I simply hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.
    Jeremy, a bondservant of the Lord.

    Today is a good day to die for Christ.

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    • #3
      Hi Jeremy! kind of proves my point "confused" because you've been "deceived"

      Got to go for now Lord willing I'll be back a wee later and begin chapter one..


      A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

      ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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      • #4
        Because I haven't settled for your end-times view, I'm "confused" and "deceived"? Right then.
        Jeremy, a bondservant of the Lord.

        Today is a good day to die for Christ.

        Comment


        • #5
          Foxes Book Of Martyrs

          It is my intention to see many come to Christ, we must remember that the Lord has called us
          to his high calling. Part of that calling is inescapable, that is to suffer for his sake as well.

          Philippians 1:
          29 For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake;
          30 Having the same conflict which ye saw in me, and now hear to be in me.


          Jude


          A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

          ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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          • #6
            Chapter One

            CHAPTER I

            History of Christian Martyrs to the First General Persecutions

            Under Nero

            Christ our Savior, in the Gospel of St. Matthew, hearing the confession of Simon Peter, who, first of all other, openly acknowledged Him to be the Son of God, and perceiving the secret hand of His Father therein, called him (alluding to his name) a rock, upon which rock He would build His Church so strong that the gates of hell should not prevail against it. In which words three things are to be noted: First, that Christ will have a Church in this world. Secondly, that the same Church should mightily be impugned, not only by the world, but also by the uttermost strength and powers of all hell. And, thirdly, that the same Church, notwithstanding the uttermost of the devil and all his malice, should continue.

            Which prophecy of Christ we see wonderfully to be verified, insomuch that the whole course of the Church to this day may seem nothing else but a verifying of the said prophecy. First, that Christ hath set up a Church, needeth no declaration. Secondly, what force of princes, kings, monarchs, governors, and rulers of this world, with their subjects, publicly and privately, with all their strength and cunning, have bent themselves against this Church! And, thirdly, how the said Church, all this notwithstanding, hath yet endured and holden its own! What storms and tempests it hath overpast, wondrous it is to behold: for the more evident declaration whereof, I have addressed this present history, to the end, first, that the wonderful works of God in His Church might appear to His glory; also that, the continuance and proceedings of the Church, from time to time, being set forth, more knowledge and experience may redound thereby, to the profit of the reader and edification of Christian faith.

            As it is not our business to enlarge upon our Savior's history, either before or after His crucifixion, we shall only find it necessary to remind our readers of the discomfiture of the Jews by His subsequent resurrection. Although one apostle had betrayed Him; although another had denied Him, under the solemn sanction of an oath; and although the rest had forsaken Him, unless we may except "the disciple who was known unto the high-priest"; the history of His resurrection gave a new direction to all their hearts, and, after the mission of the Holy Spirit, imparted new confidence to their minds. The powers with which they were endued emboldened them to proclaim His name, to the confusion of the Jewish rulers, and the astonishment of Gentile proselytes.
            A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

            ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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            • #7
              A couple things:

              1) I think "Fox's Book of Martyrs" is more a Bible Chat topic, than it is an ETC topic.

              2)
              As for pre-trib rapture...I don't believe it was created to "deceive" anyone.
              I disagree. I believe it originated a few centuries ago from less-than-honest attempts at Scripture, so as to play up the role of British Israelism and downplay anyone else. The history is rooted in figures like Margaret MacDonald, John Darby, and here in the U.S., C. Scofield. Scofield is a convicted forger and con artist, who served time in the Kansas State Penitentiary.

              That's not to say that those who believe it now are not sincerely seeking. Much like how Halloween, Easter, and Christmas are today nothing like how they originated (and not always in a good way), it's the same way with pre-trib.

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              • #8
                Foxes Book Of Martyrs

                Thanks Peter for your input, I think this is the best place for this thread.
                The reason? we are about to go through a new Inquisition a Worldwide Inquisition.
                All the players are in their respective positions, all that needs to happen is the
                sound of the starting gun. This new order will be a wee different than the first time around.

                Lastly* I won't argue that theory one way or the other its a trouble starter, I spoke my peace,
                this thread is about the book not that theory.

                Jude






                A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

                ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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                • #9
                  The book is good reading. Unfortunately your premise is bit off base, persecution is not God's wrath so you are comparing apples and oranges to make a banana split.
                  Acts 17:11

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by IPet2_9 View Post
                    I believe it originated a few centuries ago from less-than-honest attempts at Scripture, so as to play up the role of British Israelism and downplay anyone else. The history is rooted in figures like Margaret MacDonald, John Darby, and here in the U.S., C. Scofield. Scofield is a convicted forger and con artist, who served time in the Kansas State Penitentiary.
                    Exactly! John Walvoord tried to downplay Margaret MacDonald's connection to the formulation of the pre-trib rapture view in his Daniel commentary. His attempt to do so is absolutely pathetic, but I understand his motivation. No one wants their eschatology linked to a witch! the best primary historical sources on her life all substantially corroborate her personal involvement in witchcraft and spiritism. The 2-stage Second Coming position did indeed originate during one of her visitations from some sort of spirit. I doubt it was the Holy Spirit. That's why it's tough to find a conservative pre-trib Church historian. Most are fully aware of where the idea originated.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Foxes Book Of Martyrs




                      I. St. Stephen
                      St. Stephen suffered the next in order. His death was occasioned by the faithful manner in which he preached the Gospel to the betrayers and murderers of Christ. To such a degree of madness were they excited, that they cast him out of the city and stoned him to death. The time when he suffered is generally supposed to have been at the passover which succeeded to that of our Lord's crucifixion, and to the era of his ascension, in the following spring.

                      Upon this a great persecution was raised against all who professed their belief in Christ as the Messiah, or as a prophet. We are immediately told by St. Luke, that "there was a great persecution against the church which was at Jerusalem;" and that "they were all scattered abroad throughout the regions of Judaea and Samaria, except the apostles."

                      About two thousand Christians, with Nicanor, one of the seven deacons, suffered martyrdom during the "persecution that arose about Stephen."

                      II. James the Great
                      The next martyr we meet with, according to St. Luke, in the History of the Apsotles' Acts, was James the son of Zebedee, the elder brother of John, and a relative of our Lord; for his mother Salome was cousin-german to the Virgin Mary. It was not until ten years after the death of Stephen that the second martyrdom took place; for no sooner had Herod Agrippa been appointed governor of Judea, than, with a view to ingratiate himself with them, he raised a sharp persecution against the Christians, and determined to make an effectual blow, by striking at their leaders. The account given us by an eminent primitive writer, Clemens Alexandrinus, ought not to be overlooked; that, as James was led to the place of martyrdom, his accuser was brought to repent of his conduct by the apostle's extraordinary courage and undauntedness, and fell down at his feet to request his pardon, professing himself a Christian, and resolving that James should not receive the crown of martyrdom alone. Hence they were both beheaded at the same time. Thus did the first apostolic martyr cheerfully and resolutely receive that cup, which he had told our Savior he was ready to drink. Timon and Parmenas suffered martyrdom about the same time; the one at Philippi, and the other in Macedonia. These events took place A.D. 44.

                      III. Philip
                      Was born at Bethsaida, in Galilee and was first called by the name of "disciple." He labored diligently in Upper Asia, and suffered martyrdom at Heliopolis, in Phrygia. He was scourged, thrown into prison, and afterwards crucified, A.D. 54.

                      IV. Matthew
                      Whose occupation was that of a toll-gatherer, was born at Nazareth. He wrote his gospel in Hebrew, which was afterwards translated into Greek by James the Less. The scene of his labors was Parthia, and Ethiopia, in which latter country he suffered martyrdom, being slain with a halberd in the city of Nadabah, A.D. 60.
                      V. James the Less

                      Is supposed by some to have been the brother of our Lord, by a former wife of Joseph. This is very doubtful, and accords too much with the Catholic superstition, that Mary never had any other children except our Savior. He was elected to the oversight of the churches of Jerusalem; and was the author of the Epistle ascribed to James in the sacred canon. At the age of ninety-four he was beat and stoned by the Jews; and finally had his brains dashed out with a fuller's club.
                      VI. Matthias

                      Of whom less is known than of most of the other disciples, was elected to fill the vacant place of Judas. He was stoned at Jerusalem and then beheaded.
                      VII. Andrew

                      Was the brother of Peter. He preached the gospel to many Asiatic nations; but on his arrival at Edessa he was taken and crucified on a cross, the two ends of which were fixed transversely in the ground. Hence the derivation of the term, St. Andrew's Cross.
                      VIII. St. Mark

                      Was born of Jewish parents of the tribe of Levi. He is supposed to have been converted to Christianity by Peter, whom he served as an amanuensis, and under whose inspection he wrote his Gospel in the Greek language. Mark was dragged to pieces by the people of Alexandria, at the great solemnity of Serapis their idol, ending his life under their merciless hands.
                      IX. Peter

                      Among many other saints, the blessed apostle Peter was condemned to death, and crucified, as some do write, at Rome; albeit some others, and not without cause, do doubt thereof. Hegesippus saith that Nero sought matter against Peter to put him to death; which, when the people perceived, they entreated Peter with much ado that he would fly the city. Peter, through their importunity at length persuaded, prepared himself to avoid. But, coming to the gate, he saw the Lord Christ come to meet him, to whom he, worshipping, said, "Lord, whither dost Thou go?" To whom He answered and said, "I am come again to be crucified." By this, Peter, perceiving his suffering to be understood, returned into the city. Jerome saith that he was crucified, his head being down and his feet upward, himself so requiring, because he was (he said) unworthy to be crucified after the same form and manner as the Lord was.

                      X. Paul
                      Paul, the apostle, who before was called Saul, after his great travail and unspeakable labors in promoting the Gospel of Christ, suffered also in this first persecution under Nero. Abdias, declareth that under his execution Nero sent two of his esquires, Ferega and Parthemius, to bring him word of his death. They, coming to Paul instructing the people, desired him to pray for them, that they might believe; who told them that shortly after they should believe and be baptised at His sepulcher. This done, the soldiers came and led him out of the city to the place of execution, where he, after his prayers made, gave his neck to the sword.

                      XI. Jude
                      The brother of James, was commonly called Thaddeus. He was crucified at Edessa, A.D. 72.

                      XII. Bartholomew
                      Preached in several countries, and having translated the Gospel of Matthew into the language of India, he propagated it in that country. He was at length cruelly beaten and then crucified by the impatient idolaters.

                      XIII. Thomas
                      Called Didymus, preached the Gospel in Parthia and India, where exciting the rage of the pagan priests, he was martyred by being thrust through with a spear.
                      XIV. Luke

                      The evangelist, was the author of the Gospel which goes under his name. He travelled with Paul through various countries, and is supposed to have been hanged on an olive tree, by the idolatrous priests of Greece.

                      XV. Simon
                      Surnamed Zelotes, preached the Gospel in Mauritania, Africa, and even in Britain, in which latter country he was crucified, A.D. 74.

                      XVI. John
                      The "beloved disciple," was brother to James the Great. The churches of Smyrna, Pergamos, Sardis, Philadelphia, Laodicea, and Thyatira, were founded by him. From Ephesus he was ordered to be sent to Rome, where it is affirmed he was cast into a cauldron of boiling oil. He escaped by miracle, without injury. Domitian afterwards banished him to the Isle of Patmos, where he wrote the Book of Revelation. Nerva, the successor of Domitian, recalled him. He was the only apostle who escaped a violent death.
                      XVII. Barnabas

                      Was of Cyprus, but of Jewish descent, his death is supposed to have taken place about A.D. 73.
                      A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

                      ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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                      • #12
                        Foxes Book Of Martyrs

                        FOX'S BOOK OF MARTYRS
                        CHAPTER II
                        The Ten Primitive Persecutions
                        The First Persecution, Under Nero, A.D. 67

                        The first persecution of the Church took place in the year 67, under Nero, the sixth emperor of Rome. This monarch reigned for the space of five years, with tolerable credit to himself, but then gave way to the greatest extravagancy of temper, and to the most atrocious barbarities. Among other diabolical whims, he ordered that the city of Rome should be set on fire, which order was executed by his officers, guards, and servants. While the imperial city was in flames, he went up to the tower of Macaenas, played upon his harp, sung the song of the burning of Troy, and openly declared that 'he wished the ruin of all things before his death.' Besides the noble pile, called the Circus, many other palaces and houses were consumed; several thousands perished in the flames, were smothered in the smoke, or buried beneath the ruins.

                        This dreadful conflagration continued nine days; when Nero, finding that his conduct was greatly blamed, and a severe odium cast upon him, determined to lay the whole upon the Christians, at once to excuse himself, and have an opportunity of glutting his sight with new cruelties. This was the occasion of the first persecution; and the barbarities exercised on the Christians were such as even excited the commiseration of the Romans themselves. Nero even refined upon cruelty, and contrived all manner of punishments for the Christians that the most infernal imagination could design. In particular, he had some sewed up in skins of wild beasts, and then worried by dogs until they expired; and others dressed in shirts made stiff with wax, fixed to axletrees, and set on fire in his gardens, in order to illuminate them. This persecution was general throughout the whole Roman Empire; but it rather increased than diminished the spirit of Christianity. In the course of it, St. Paul and St. Peter were martyred.

                        To their names may be added, Erastus, chamberlain of Corinth; Aristarchus, the Macedonian, and Trophimus, an Ephesians, converted by St. Paul, and fellow-laborer with him, Joseph, commonly called Barsabas, and Ananias, bishop of Damascus; each of the Seventy.
                        A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

                        ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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                        • #13
                          Foxes Book Of Martyrs

                          The Second Persecution, Under Domitian, A.D. 81

                          The emperor Domitian, who was naturally inclined to cruelty, first slew his brother, and then raised the second persecution against the Christians. In his rage he put to death some of the Roman senators, some through malice; and others to confiscate their estates. He then commanded all the lineage of David be put to death.

                          Among the numerous martyrs that suffered during this persecution was Simeon, bishop of Jerusalem, who was crucified; and St. John, who was boiled in oil, and afterward banished to Patmos. Flavia, the daughter of a Roman senator, was likewise banished to Pontus; and a law was made, "That no Christian, once brought before the tribunal, should be exempted from punishment without renouncing his religion."

                          A variety of fabricated tales were, during this reign, composed in order to injure the Christians. Such was the infatuation of the pagans, that, if famine, pestilence, or earthquakes afflicted any of the Roman provinces, it was laid upon the Christians. These persecutions among the Christians increased the number of informers and many, for the sake of gain, swore away the lives of the innocent.

                          Another hardship was, that, when any Christians were brought before the magistrates, a test oath was proposed, when, if they refused to take it, death was pronounced against them; and if they confessed themselves Christians, the sentence was the same.

                          The following were the most remarkable among the numerous martyrs who suffered during this persecution.

                          Dionysius, the Areopagite, was an Athenian by birth, and educated in all the useful and ornamental literature of Greece. He then travelled to Egypt to study astronomy, and made very particular observations on the great and supernatural eclipse, which happened at the time of our Savior's crucifixion.

                          The sanctity of his conversation and the purity of his manners recommended him so strongly to the Christians in general, that he was appointed bishop of Athens.

                          Nicodemus, a benevolent Christian of some distinction, suffered at Rome during the rage of Domitian's persecution.

                          Protasius and Gervasius were martyred at Milan.

                          Timothy was the celebrated disciple of St. Paul, and bishop of Ephesus, where he zealously governed the Church until A.D. 97. At this period, as the pagans were about to celebrate a feast called Catagogion, Timothy, meeting the procession, severely reproved them for their ridiculous idolatry, which so exasperated the people that they fell upon him with their clubs, and beat him in so dreadful a manner that he expired of the bruises two days later.
                          A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

                          ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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                          • #14
                            Foxes Book Of Martyrs

                            The Third Persecution, Under Trajan, A.D. 108

                            In the third persecution Pliny the Second, a man learned and famous, seeing the lamentable slaughter of Christians, and moved therewith to pity, wrote to Trajan, certifying him that there were many thousands of them daily put to death, of which none did any thing contrary to the Roman laws worthy of persecution. "The whole account they gave of their crime or error (whichever it is to be called) amounted only to this-viz. that they were accustomed on a stated day to meet before daylight, and to repeat together a set form of prayer to Christ as a God, and to bind themselves by an obligation-not indeed to commit wickedness; but, on the contrary-never to commit theft, robbery, or adultery, never to falsify their word, never to defraud any man: after which it was their custom to separate, and reassemble to partake in common of a harmless meal."

                            In this persecution suffered the blessed martyr, Ignatius, who is held in famous reverence among very many. This Ignatius was appointed to the bishopric of Antioch next after Peter in succession. Some do say, that he, being sent from Syria to Rome, because he professed Christ, was given to the wild beasts to be devoured. It is also said of him, that when he passed through Asia, being under the most strict custody of his keepers, he strengthened and confirmed the churches through all the cities as he went, both with his exhortations and preaching of the Word of God. Accordingly, having come to Smyrna, he wrote to the Church at Rome, exhorting them not to use means for his deliverance from martyrdom, lest they should deprive him of that which he most longed and hoped for. "Now I begin to be a disciple. I care for nothing, of visible or invisible things, so that I may but win Christ. Let fire and the cross, let the companies of wild beasts, let breaking of bones and tearing of limbs, let the grinding of the whole body, and all the malice of the devil, come upon me; be it so, only may I win Christ Jesus!" And even when he was sentenced to be thrown to the beasts, such as the burning desire that he had to suffer, that he spake, what time he heard the lions roaring, saying: "I am the wheat of Christ: I am going to be ground with the teeth of wild beasts, that I may be found pure bread."

                            Trajan being succeeded by Adrian, the latter continued this third persecution with as much severity as his predecessor. About this time Alexander, bishop of Rome, with his two deacons, were martyred; as were Quirinus and Hernes, with their families;

                            Zenon, a Roman nobleman, and about ten thousand other Christians.

                            In Mount Ararat many were crucified, crowned with thorns, and spears run into their sides, in imitation of Christ's passion. Eustachius, a brave and successful Roman commander, was by the emperor ordered to join in an idolatrous sacrifice to celebrate some of his own victories; but his faith (being a Christian in his heart) was so much greater than his vanity, that he nobly refused it. Enraged at the denial, the ungrateful emperor forgot the service of this skilful commander, and ordered him and his whole family to be martyred.

                            At the martyrdom of Faustines and Jovita, brothers and citizens of Brescia, their torments were so many, and their patience so great, that Calocerius, a pagan, beholding them, was struck with admiration, and exclaimed in a kind of ecstasy, "Great is the God of the Christians!" for which he was apprehended, and suffered a similar fate.

                            Many other similar cruelties and rigors were exercised against the Christians, until Quadratus, bishop of Athens, made a learned apology in their favor before the emperor, who happened to be there and Aristides, a philosopher of the same city, wrote an elegant epistle, which caused Adrian to relax in his severities, and relent in their favor.

                            Adrian dying A.D. 138, was succeeded by Antoninus Pius, one of the most amiable monarchs that ever reigned, and who stayed the persecutions against the Christians.
                            A man is in a great place when he has no one to turn to but God.

                            ~ Smith Wigglesworth

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by scourge39 View Post
                              Exactly! John Walvoord tried to downplay Margaret MacDonald's connection to the formulation of the pre-trib rapture view in his Daniel commentary. His attempt to do so is absolutely pathetic, but I understand his motivation. No one wants their eschatology linked to a witch! the best primary historical sources on her life all substantially corroborate her personal involvement in witchcraft and spiritism. The 2-stage Second Coming position did indeed originate during one of her visitations from some sort of spirit. I doubt it was the Holy Spirit. That's why it's tough to find a conservative pre-trib Church historian. Most are fully aware of where the idea originated.
                              Have you read the vision. IT ISN'T PRE TRIB!! Read it, it's mid or post, but it aint pre.


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