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  • Information Black History Month Acknowledgments

    I have many great ancestors who shoulders I stand on, I was taught not to ever ascertain that I have done anything on my own, for blood was shed and prayers lifted for my present and my future, so I want to each day of this month honor those who gave their lives to give me mine.

    The one quality that I admire in an individual is that of going back to help those from where you come from, be that literally or spiritually.



    Harriet Tubman

    1)Every Jan. 29, the United States celebrates the birth of Harriet Tubman, the African-American abolitionist born into slavery who helped guide hundreds of slaves out of the South to freedom in the North. Born in 1820 as Araminta Harriet Ross, she escaped slavery in 1849 and became a guide along the Underground Railroad, reportedly making 19 rescue missions.

    After serving as a spy for the Union Army during the U.S. Civil war, she died of pneumonia in 1913. On the celebration of her birth, here are a couple of facts you may not have known about the abolitionist leader, compiled from PBS, Mental Floss, the Harriet Tubman Historical Society and History.com.

    1) She was nicknamed “Moses”
    While taking slaves to freedom, some called her Moses, in reference to the biblical prophet who led the Israelite slaves out of Egypt.
    During her trips along the Underground Railroad, she allegedly never lost a single passenger


    2) A high bounty
    Even though she lived in the North, Tubman was still a fugitive slave, meaning if she were caught she could have been put back into slavery. A high bounty was placed on her, but she would apparently start her rescues on Saturday so she and the escaped slaves could have the full weekend before newspapers ran the ads for her bounty in the Monday editions.

    3) Tubman and the women’s rights movement
    Tubman not only advocated for the abolition of slavery, but also for women’s rights when it was still highly controversial. While she couldn’t read, she still gave speeches on her experiences as a woman slave
    It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

  • #2
    Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

    Originally posted by always View Post
    I have many great ancestors who shoulders I stand on, I was taught not to ever ascertain that I have done anything on my own, for blood was shed and prayers lifted for my present and my future, so I want to each day of this month honor those who gave their lives to give me mine.

    The one quality that I admire in an individual is that of going back to help those from where you come from, be that literally or spiritually.



    Harriet Tubman

    1)Every Jan. 29, the United States celebrates the birth of Harriet Tubman, the African-American abolitionist born into slavery who helped guide hundreds of slaves out of the South to freedom in the North. Born in 1820 as Araminta Harriet Ross, she escaped slavery in 1849 and became a guide along the Underground Railroad, reportedly making 19 rescue missions.

    After serving as a spy for the Union Army during the U.S. Civil war, she died of pneumonia in 1913. On the celebration of her birth, here are a couple of facts you may not have known about the abolitionist leader, compiled from PBS, Mental Floss, the Harriet Tubman Historical Society and History.com.

    1) She was nicknamed “Moses”
    While taking slaves to freedom, some called her Moses, in reference to the biblical prophet who led the Israelite slaves out of Egypt.
    During her trips along the Underground Railroad, she allegedly never lost a single passenger


    2) A high bounty
    Even though she lived in the North, Tubman was still a fugitive slave, meaning if she were caught she could have been put back into slavery. A high bounty was placed on her, but she would apparently start her rescues on Saturday so she and the escaped slaves could have the full weekend before newspapers ran the ads for her bounty in the Monday editions.

    3) Tubman and the women’s rights movement
    Tubman not only advocated for the abolition of slavery, but also for women’s rights when it was still highly controversial. While she couldn’t read, she still gave speeches on her experiences as a woman slave
    I have always wondered why we have "black history month." We do not have red history month. We do not have white history month. Black history month seems racist to me.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

      As a conservative white person, I can assure you that we have Black History Month so that our children can learn that black people were more than just former slaves - so much more. I enjoyed teaching Black History Month and Women's History Month.

      As someone who taught American history, I can tell you - it's all about history from the perspective of white males. The occasional minority was mentioned, but sporadically. If the wide contributions of black people and all minorities were adequately spread throughout our American history books, we would have no need of these months.

      I know that isn't going to appease some who question these months, but that's the best answer I have.
      sigpic
      ".....it's your nickel"

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

        Originally posted by jayne View Post
        As a conservative white person, I can assure you that we have Black History Month so that our children can learn that black people were more than just former slaves - so much more. I enjoyed teaching Black History Month and Women's History Month.

        As someone who taught American history, I can tell you - it's all about history from the perspective of white males. The occasional minority was mentioned, but sporadically. If the wide contributions of black people and all minorities were adequately spread throughout our American history books, we would have no need of these months.

        I know that isn't going to appease some who question these months, but that's the best answer I have.
        I like what my university professor of American History said when Black history month rolled around and he was questioned about it. He said "We will deal with blacks, whites, orientals, and Nave Americans when we come to them."

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

          Originally posted by Reynolds357 View Post
          I like what my university professor of American History said when Black history month rolled around and he was questioned about it. He said "We will deal with blacks, whites, orientals, and Nave Americans when we come to them."

          Great! It's February, We have come to them..... and I do mean THEM for the contributions of Black Americans and contributions from any race of Americans benefits us all. Thanks Reynolds
          It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

            Originally posted by always View Post
            Great! It's February, We have come to them..... and I do mean THEM for the contributions of Black Americans and contributions from any race of Americans benefits us all. Thanks Reynolds
            Exactly. We need to start being one nation and quit pointing out and calling attention to color.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

              Originally posted by Reynolds357 View Post
              Exactly. We need to start being one nation and quit pointing out and calling attention to color.
              You are welcome to post our native American heritage accomplishments as well, you do remember that I am part Creek as well as you
              It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                Back in the seventies in college I took a quarter of history of American minorities. We were also required to read Malcolm X and do a report on it. The teacher was Japanese and was a child in the internment camps with his parents. I loved that class. I'm glad I took it.

                I don't know if black history month serves any good purpose because I don't know that anyone learns from it. What I hope is that they teach history that is true and not revisionist and include all minorities.

                But if black history month does teach kids about blacks and their history in this country, then I would say it's a good thing.

                I'd like to see a Native American history month too if kids would then learn about their history.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                  Originally posted by always View Post
                  You are welcome to post our native American heritage accomplishments as well, you do remember that I am part Creek as well as you
                  There is no "Red history month." I do not feel left out in the least. I do not want a special category.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                    Originally posted by Reynolds357 View Post
                    There is no "Red history month." I do not feel left out in the least. I do not want a special category.
                    But history is very important. Part of why we have so many people that would vote for the likes of obama, hillary and a socialist is because they haven't a clue about our history. History gives perspective, warning and guidance for the present which helps preserve the future.

                    If history wasn't important, there would be far less of it in the bible.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                      There is no greater love than the love that one would give his life

                      Crispus Attucks (c.1723—March 5, 1770)

                      Was the first casualty of the Boston massacre, in Boston, Massachusetts, and is widely considered to be the first American casualty in the American Revolutionary War. Aside from the event of his death, along with Samuel Gray and James Caldwell, little is known for certain about Attucks, He may have been an African American slave or freeman, merchant seaman and dockworker of Wampanoag and African descent. His father was an African-born slave and his mother a Native American.

                      Despite the lack of clarity, Attucks became an icon of the anti-slavery movement in the 18th century. He was held up as the first martyr of the American Revolution, along with the others killed. In the early 19th century, as the abolitionist movement gained momentum in Boston, supporters lauded Attucks as an African American who played a heroic role in the history of the United States.

                      Historians disagree on whether Crispus Attucks was a free man or an escaped slave, but agree that he was of Wampanoag and African descent. Two major sources of eyewitness testimony about the Boston Massacre, both published in 1770, did not refer to Attucks as "black" nor as a "Negro"; it appeared that Bostonians of European descent viewed him as being of mixed ethnicity.

                      According to a contemporary account in the Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia), he was a "Mulattoe man, named Crispus Attucks, who was born in Framingham, but lately belonged to New-Providence, and was here in order to go for North Carolina . . Because of his mixed heritage, his story is also significant for Native Americans as well.
                      It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                        Originally posted by EarlyCall View Post
                        But history is very important. Part of why we have so many people that would vote for the likes of obama, hillary and a socialist is because they haven't a clue about our history. History gives perspective, warning and guidance for the present which helps preserve the future.

                        If history wasn't important, there would be far less of it in the bible.
                        My minor is in US History with emphasis of pre-civil war, civil war, reconstruction era. I know the importance of history. I see no importance in having a month to teach the history of a single race. Integrate it into the rest of history. The most important era in U.S. history is actually the era between the world wars. We do not have "rise of Hitler month."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                          Originally posted by Reynolds357 View Post
                          My minor is in US History with emphasis of pre-civil war, civil war, reconstruction era. I know the importance of history. I see no importance in having a month to teach the history of a single race. Integrate it into the rest of history. The most important era in U.S. history is actually the era between the world wars. We do not have "rise of Hitler month."

                          Keyword I, there are I's Reynolds, that do see an importance in it, your viewpoint is like saying you don't think it's important for your parents to teach you who your great-grandparents were and that is your purogative.

                          History explains attitudes, fears, confidence and so many other things going on with each of us........ there is nothing wrong with knowing our contributions seperately and collectively.

                          Just chill out Reynolds!
                          It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                            I fully understand the reasons for Black History Month, how it all began and why it's still relevant today. I support it and have no idea why others get offended over it.

                            And yes, once again, the keywords there were I



                            I'm sorry I just can't help myself. Love ya sis! Please continue. Just so you know, others do appreciate this thread.
                            "Some people's idea of free speech is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone says anything back that is an outrage."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                              Originally posted by BrianW View Post
                              I fully understand the reasons for Black History Month, how it all began and why it's still relevant today. I support it and have no idea why others get offended over it.

                              And yes, once again, the keywords there were I



                              I'm sorry I just can't help myself. Love ya sis! Please continue. Just so you know, others do appreciate this thread.
                              I can tell you exactly why I get offended by it. It singles out a single race for emphasis. It conveys the message that the black race is more important than other minority races. When we look at other subjects of study, do we have physics month? Do we have Chemistry month? Do we have Algebra month? No! we deal with them in their logical order of instruction.

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