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Black History Month Acknowledgments

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  • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

    Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009) was an American singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer, and actor. Called the King of Pop,his contributions to music and dance, along with his publicized personal life, made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.

    The eighth child of the Jackson family, he debuted on the professional music scene along with his elder brothers Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon as a member of the Jackson 5 in 1964, and began his solo career in 1971.

    In the early 1980s, Jackson became a dominant figure in popular music. The music videos for his songs, including those of "Beat It", "Billie Jean", and "Thriller" from his 1982 album Thriller, were credited with breaking down racial barriers and with transforming the medium into an art form and promotional tool. The popularity of these videos helped to bring the then-relatively-new television channel MTV to fame.

    His 1987 album Bad spawned the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 number-one singles "I Just Can't Stop Loving You", "Bad", "The Way You Make Me Feel", "Man in the Mirror", and "Dirty Diana", becoming the first album to have five number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100.

    With videos such as "Black or White" and "Scream", he continued to innovate the medium throughout the 1990s, as well as forging a reputation as a touring solo artist. Through stage and video performances,

    Jackson popularized a number of complicated dance techniques, such as the robot and the moonwalk, to which he gave the name. His distinctive sound and style has influenced numerous artists of various music genres.

    Thriller is the best-selling album of all time, with estimated sales of 65 million copies worldwide. His other albums, including Off the Wall (1979), Bad (1987), Dangerous (1991), and HIStory (1995), also rank among the world's best-selling albums. Jackson is one of the few artists to have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice.

    He was also inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Dance Hall of Fame as the first and only dancer from pop and rock music. His other achievements include multiple Guinness World Records, 13 Grammy Awards, the Grammy Legend Award, the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, 26 American Music Awards—more than any other artist—including the "Artist of the Century" and "Artist of the 1980s", 13 number-one singles in the United States during his solo career,—more than any other male artist in the Hot 100 era—and estimated sales of over 400 million records worldwide.

    Jackson has won hundreds of awards, making him the most awarded recording artist in the history of popular music.

    He became the first artist in history to have a top ten single in the Billboard Hot 100 in five different decades when "Love Never Felt So Good" reached number nine on May 21, 2014. Jackson traveled the world attending events honoring his humanitarianism, and, in 2000, the Guinness World Records recognized him for supporting 39 charities, more than any other entertainer.

    Aspects of Michael Jackson's personal life, including his changing appearance, personal relationships, and behavior, generated controversy. In the mid-1990s, he was accused of child sexual abuse, but the civil case was settled out of court for an undisclosed amount and no formal charges were brought.

    In 2005, he was tried and acquitted of further child sexual abuse allegations and several other charges after the jury found him not guilty on all counts. While preparing for his comeback concert series titled This Is It, Jackson died of acute propofol and benzodiazepine intoxication on June 25, 2009, after suffering from cardiac arrest. The Los Angeles County Coroner ruled his death a homicide, and his personal physician, Conrad Murray, was convicted of involuntary manslaughter. Jackson's death triggered a global outpouring of grief, and a live broadcast of his public memorial service was viewed around the world.

    Forbes currently ranks Jackson as the top-earning dead celebrity, a title held for a sixth consecutive year, with $115 million in earnings
    It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

    Comment


    • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

      Originally posted by jayne View Post
      As a conservative white person, I can assure you that we have Black History Month so that our children can learn that black people were more than just former slaves - so much more. I enjoyed teaching Black History Month and Women's History Month.

      As someone who taught American history, I can tell you - it's all about history from the perspective of white males. The occasional minority was mentioned, but sporadically. If the wide contributions of black people and all minorities were adequately spread throughout our American history books, we would have no need of these months.

      I know that isn't going to appease some who question these months, but that's the best answer I have.
      Are we going to talk about how some African Blacks sold their fellow Blacks into slavery too? That is history often forgotten.

      Comment


      • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

        Alan Keyes

        Alan Lee Keyes was born at a naval hospital on Long Island on August 7, 1950. He was the fifth child of Allison and Gerthina Keyes, a sergeant in the U.S. Army. The family moved frequently as a consequence of Gerthina's military career.

        Keyes attended Cornell University, where he studied political philosophy. He actively opposed campus protests against the Vietnam War, in which his father and brothers served. He ultimately transferred to Harvard University, from which he received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in government affairs.

        A year before completing his doctoral studies, Keyes joined the State Department, working with United Nations Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick. His posts included Mumbai, India and Zimbabwe. President Ronald Reagan subsequently appointed Keyes to several diplomatic positions with the United Nations.

        Keyes accepted the Republican nomination for a Maryland Senate seat in 1988 and 1992. He lost both races.

        In 1996, Keyes sought the Republican presidential nomination. His candidacy was intended to draw attention to the issue of abortion. His outspoken criticism of other Republican candidates was unpopular within his own party. Keyes ran in the Republican presidential primary in 2000 on a pro-life, family values platform. While he failed to clinch the nomination, Keyes did well in several states, finishing third in the Iowa caucuses and receiving 20 percent of the vote in Utah.

        In August 2004, the Illinois Republican Party drafted Alan Keyes to run against Barack Obama for the U.S. Senate. Obama defeated Keyes.

        Keyes again ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 2008. He ultimately earned two delegates to the Republican National Convention.

        In March 2008, Keyes left the Republican Party and joined the Constitution Party. He lost the party's nomination to Chuck Baldwin. His supporters then formed a new group, America's Independent Party, which was only on the ballot in three states.

        On November 14, 2008, Keyes filed a lawsuit charging Barack Obama with fraudulent misrepresentation of his place of birth. Keyes refused to recognize Obama as the president, and has called him a "usurper" and a "radical communist."

        In addition to his political work, Keyes has hosted several syndicated radio and television programs. He also appeared in the 2006 film Borat.
        Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

        Comment


        • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

          Al Sharpton: a highly accomplished African American talk show host and respected civil rights leader. Below he is at his best.

          www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggHWRpsMEmk

          www.youtube.com/watch?v=VD6MTlT2Ye8&ebc=ANyPxKpQ6NmmUMlLv0X6qYdtAT Z7GD8krmDjwMCsp1pqzS6dHsEeFyBYmRGnlFFN0bfUdcFhKjvY-Y6JzJnc9HwpKNcivgpPWw

          www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CifYWxJXaI

          www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKHKTAY5b4M

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSXFY...60jejWq6eJ84ZA

          Comment


          • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

            Originally posted by James_Roberts View Post
            Are we going to talk about how some African Blacks sold their fellow Blacks into slavery too? That is history often forgotten.
            Reynolds did post some in reference to them James, and black slave owners, again history is a legacy, of conflicts and much more, we as a people grew to understand that God is always God in every situation, and that ALL things work for the good of those that love the Lord,
            It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

            Comment


            • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

              List of Heritage Celebrations

              September

              Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated each September 15 - October 15 in the United States of America to recognize the contributions made by people of Hispanic descent and to celebrate Hispanic culture. Hispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15 because it is the anniversary of 5 Latin American countries' Independence Day: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.

              October

              German American Heritage Month: Beginning on October 6, 1987 as German American Day, the culture and achievement of Americans of German descent is now celebrated during a month-long period between. Established in 1995, German American Heritage Month spans these dates so as to encompass festivals like Oktoberfest and Steuben parades.

              Italian Heritage Month is set in October to coincide with Columbus Day. Italian Heritage Month celebrates the many achievements and successes of not only Americans of Italian descent, but also Italians living in America. America was named after an Italian (Amerigo Vespucci). It is also important to note that language plays a very large part of this celebration as it is thought of as an intrinsic part of Italian culture.

              Polish American Heritage Month is celebrated each year in October to commemorate the contributions to American society made by those of Polish descent.

              November

              Native American Heritage Month was initially celebrated in 1916 by the state of New York. It was not until 1990 that then President George H.W. Bush established it as a month long festival. Not only does Native American Indian Heritage Month showcase the rich culture of the native people of this land, but also honors those American Indians that have suffered injustices. Therefore, we celebrate all Native Americans during the month of November.
              January

              Dr. Martin Luther King Day: On the third Monday of January each year, we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Day. Dr. Martin Luther King Day is the only national holiday commemorating the actions of an African-American. Originally petitioned to honor King's dedication to trade unions, it would be established on November 2, 1983 by Ronald Reagan.

              February

              Black History Month: Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month, is celebrated each February in the United States. Because of the timing of the birthdays of two very important individuals in the fight to end slavery, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln, Black History Week was originally slated for the second week in February in 1926. In 1976 it was expanded to encompass the entire month of February to recognize the significant achievements made by the African-American community in all aspects of American society.

              March

              Women's History Month: Annually celebrated in March, Women's History Month acknowledges the many contributions women have made in America's rich past. From its beginnings as International Women's Day on March 8, 1911, it has been expanded twice by the United States Congress first as a weeklong celebration in 1981 and to its current month-long celebration in 1987.

              Irish American History Month is celebrated every March. We honor the achievements made by Irish-Americans during this time. For many generations those of Irish heritage have contributed to our society. It is for this reason that we take pride in celebrating Irish culture.

              April

              Scottish American Heritage Month is celebrated in April. National Tartan Day, held each year on April 6 in the United States, celebrates the historical links between Scotland and North America and the contributions Scottish Americans have made to US history and society. Frequently, Scottish culture is celebrated through festivals known as Highland games. Various events include Whisky tastings, eating Haggis, Caber toss, Hammer throws, and traditional Scottish dances.

              May

              Asian & Pacific Islander Month: In May, we recognize the contributions of those of Asian and Pacific Islander decent. Asian Pacific American Heritage month began in 1978 as Asian American Heritage Week celebrated the first week of every May, chosen because the first immigrants from Japan arrived on May 7, 1843. It has since been expanded to encompass the entire month of May.

              Cinco De Mayo: Widely celebrated in the United States, Cinco de Mayo ("Fifth of May") is a National holiday in Mexico. Commonly misconceived as Mexican Independence Day, Cinco de Mayo actually celebrates the victory of Mexican forces led by General Ignacio Zaragoza over the French occupational forces in the Battle of Puebla on 05 May 1862.

              Jewish American Heritage Month is celebrated in May. Seeking a place to practice their beliefs without fear of prosecution, Jewish settlers first came to America. We celebrate that trek and celebrate the faith and culture of the Jewish people. Through their faith and commitment, America has become a more soulful nation and it is with this in mind that we honor them.

              June

              Caribbean American Heritage Month is an opportunity to show our appreciation for the many ways Caribbean Americans have contributed to our country. Caribbean Americans have helped to shape our national fabric with their vibrant traditions and their unique history. We celebrate and recognize the Caribbean Americans whose determination and hard work have helped make our country a better place.

              Black Music Month: Not only has the work of African American musicians inspired us as a people for generations, but it has also infused itself with the popular music of today. Bearing this in mind, we honor Black musicians during the month of June, celebrating those that paved the way for rap, hip-hop, R & B, and every other genre with smooth jazz and ethereal vocals.

              Juneteenth Celebration: Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865. On that day Union soldiers rode through Texas announcing that Lincoln had given the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the slaves. Celebrated informally since 1865, Texas became the first state to celebrate it officially on June 3, 1979. Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.

              July

              Independence Day: On July 4, 1776 the United States of America declared its independence from Great Britain. It is an iconic day to Americans celebrating their freedom thanks to the ancestors who fought for life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Through generations it has morphed from an anti-British-rule celebration to a celebration of what makes us the USA.
              It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

              Comment


              • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                Lift Every Voice and Sing by James Weldon Johnson Negro National Anthem


                Lift every voice and sing Till earth and heaven ring,
                Ring with the harmonies of Liberty;
                Let our rejoicing rise, High as the listening skies,
                Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
                Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us,
                Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us,
                Facing the rising sun, of our new day begun
                Let us march on till victory is won.

                Stony the road we trod, Bitter the chastening rod,
                Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
                Yet with a steady beat, Have not our weary feet
                Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
                It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

                Comment


                • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                  Originally posted by always View Post
                  Reynolds did post some in reference to them James, and black slave owners, again history is a legacy, of conflicts and much more, we as a people grew to understand that God is always God in every situation, and that ALL things work for the good of those that love the Lord,
                  I'm sorry I missed that. I'm having some problems with my eyesight and I haven't been reading or posting as much.

                  Comment


                  • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                    Originally posted by James_Roberts View Post
                    I'm sorry I missed that. I'm having some problems with my eyesight and I haven't been reading or posting as much.
                    Thats fine, I personally am grateful for your interest! No individual listed in this thread is a perfect individual, and I would not expect them to be, but again I say every contribution had the same goal.
                    It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

                    Comment


                    • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                      Has anyone mentioned William Seymour who was used to start the Azuza street revival? Maybe things like this are the reason we need a Black History month.

                      http://www.azusastreet.org/WilliamJSeymour.htm:
                      Bishop William J. Seymour

                      Pastor of the Apostolic Faith Mission

                      312 Azusa Street - Los Angeles, California


                      William Joseph Seymour was born May 2, 1870 in Centerville, St. Mary's Parish, Louisiana. His parents, Simon Seymour (also known as Simon Simon) and Phillis Salabar were both former slaves. Phillis was born and reared on the Adilard Carlin plantation near Centerville (Please visit the William Seymour's Birth page for additional information and illustrations).

                      When President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation ending slavery in the rebel states, Simon enlisted in the Northern Army and served until the end of the Civil War. While with the United States Colored Troops he marched across the southern gulf states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. During his service, he became ill and was hospitalized in New Orleans. From the descriptions, it seems he may have contracted malaria or another tropical disease in the southern swamps. Simon never fully recovered.

                      William Seymour, the oldest in a large family, lived his early years in abject poverty. In 1896 the family's possessions were listed as "one old bedstead, one old chair and one old mattress." All of his mother's personal property was valued at fifty-five cents.

                      Seymour also suffered the injustice and prejudice of the reconstruction south. Violence against freedman was common and groups like the Ku Klux Klan terrorized southern Louisiana.

                      The young Seymour was exposed to various Christian traditions. His parents were married by a Methodist preacher; the infant William was baptized in the Roman Catholic Church in Franklin, Louisiana; and, Simon and Phillis were buried at a Baptist Church.

                      Many accounts of Seymour's life say he was illiterate. This is not true. He attended a freedman school in Centerville and learned to read and write. In fact, his signature shows a good penmanship.

                      Fleeing the poverty and oppression of life in southern Louisiana, Seymour left his home in early adulthood. He traveled and worked in Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, and other states possibly including Missouri and Tennessee. He often worked as a waiter in big city hotels.

                      In Indianapolis, Seymour was converted in a Methodist Church. Soon, however, he joined the Church of God Reformation movement in Anderson, Indiana. At the time, the group was called "The Evening Light Saints." While with this conservative Holiness group, Seymour was sanctified and called to preach.

                      In Cincinnati, Ohio after a near fatal bout with smallpox, Seymour yielded to the call to ministry. The illness left him blind in one eye and scarred his face. For the rest of his life he wore a beard to hide the scars.

                      In 1905, Seymour was in Houston, Texas where he heard the Pentecostal message for the first time. He attended a Bible school conducted by Charles F. Parham. Parham was the founder of the Apostolic Faith Movement, and is the father of the modern Pentecostal/Charismatic revival. At a Bible school in Topeka, Kansas, his followers had received a baptism in the Holy Spirit with the biblical evidence of speaking in tongues. (To learn more about Parham and the origins of Pentecost, see The Topeka Outpouring of 1901 available from our online bookstore. Click the title for ordering information.)

                      Because of the strict segregation laws of the times, Seymour was forced to sit outside the class room in the hall way. The humble servant of God bore the injustice with grace. Seymour must have been a man of keen intellect. In just a few weeks, he became familiar enough with Parham's teaching that he could teach it himself. Seymour, however, did not receive the Holy Spirit baptism with the evidence of speaking in tongues.

                      Parham and Seymour held joint meetings in Houston, with Seymour preaching to black audiences and Parham speaking to the white groups. Parham hoped to use Seymour to spread the Apostolic Faith message to the African-Americans in Texas.

                      Neely Terry, a guest from Los Angeles met Seymour while he was preaching at a small church regularly pastored by Lucy Farrar (also spelled Farrow). Farrar was also an employee of Parham and was serving his family in Kansas.

                      When Terry returned to Los Angeles, she persuaded the small Holiness church she attended to call Seymour to Los Angeles for a meeting. Her pastor, Julia Hutchinson, extended the invitation.

                      Seymour arrived in Los Angeles in February 1906. His early efforts to preach the Pentecostal message were rebuffed and he was locked out of the church. The leadership were suspicious of Seymour's doctrine, but were especially concerned that he was preaching an experience that he had not received.

                      Moving into the home of Edward Lee, a janitor at a local bank, Bishop Seymour began ministry with a prayer group that had been meeting regularly at the home of Richard and Ruth Asbery, at 214 North Bonnie Brae. Asbery was also employed as a janitor. Most of the worshippers were African-American, with occasional visits from whites. As the group sought God for revival, their hunger intensified.

                      Finally, on April 9, Lee was baptized in the Holy Spirit with the evidence of speaking in other tongues. When the news of his baptism was shared with the true believers at Bonnie Brae, a powerful outpouring followed. Many received the Holy Spirit baptism as Pentecostal revival arrived on the West Coast. That evening would be hard to describe. People fell to the floor as if unconscious, others shouted adn ran through the house. One neighbor, Jennie Evans Moore played the piano, something she did not have the ability to do before.

                      Over the next few days of continuous outpouring, hundreds gathered. The streets were filled and Seymour preached from the Asbery's porch. On April 12, three days after the initial outpouring, Seymour received his baptism of power.
                      Can anyone imagine this man being required to sit out in the hall just because he was black?
                      Mal 3:16 Then they that feared the Lord spake often one to another: and the Lord hearkened, and heard it, and a book of remembrance was written before him for them that feared the Lord, and that thought upon his name.

                      Comment


                      • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                        Originally posted by shepherdsword View Post
                        Has anyone mentioned William Seymour who was used to start the Azuza street revival? Maybe things like this are the reason we need a Black History month.

                        http://www.azusastreet.org/WilliamJSeymour.htm:


                        Can anyone imagine this man being required to sit out in the hall just because he was black?

                        Praise the Lord ShepherdsWord, thank you, I did mentioned C.H. Mason, founder of the COGIC, who accompanied Bishop Seymour to that blessed meeting.
                        It takes love to embrace those ones who are weak, and strength to endure the weakness, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me

                        Comment


                        • Re: Black History Month Acknowledgments

                          Originally posted by shepherdsword View Post
                          Has anyone mentioned William Seymour who was used to start the Azuza street revival? Maybe things like this are the reason we need a Black History month.

                          http://www.azusastreet.org/WilliamJSeymour.htm:


                          Can anyone imagine this man being required to sit out in the hall just because he was black?
                          Well, I would sit with him, because that's where Jesus would have sat.
                          Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

                          Comment

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