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Thread: 8 hour school days

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Lyndie View Post
    I do hope that if it does go to eight hours they will eliminate the homework aspect of it. My son's friend goes to a school where she gets about 4-5 hours a night. I can't imagine having to do that. I do wonder what changed so much over the years that we think we have to do this in the first place? A long time ago, schools for the msot part were okay, kids were learning. Honestly, I think it has more to do with what goes on out of school than in school.
    Why is it that most Americans seem to be so afraid of academic study?

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jane Lane View Post
    Why is it that most Americans seem to be so afraid of academic study?
    I don't think academic study and homework loads are the same thing. I have heard the rule of thumb for homework is 10 minutes per grade level (excluding projects and extra stuff like that).
    Do not say, “Why were the old days better than these?” For it is not wise to ask such questions.
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  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Jane Lane View Post
    Why is it that most Americans seem to be so afraid of academic study?
    Why is it that some people believe the only way/best way to learn is sitting in a classroom with a book attached to your hip?

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by SeekingWisdom View Post
    Why is it that some people believe the only way/best way to learn is sitting in a classroom with a book attached to your hip?
    Personal experience has shown that a lecture, with intensive study have been the best ways to learn and retain new information, along with practice. Practice in math is working out problems, practice in writing is.. writing, chemistry is playing with chemicals..

    There may be other ways to learn, and they are being explored more and more each year. However, because most of these methods are new, it's taking some time to actually teach the teachers how to do these. Classes for "alternative learning" ARE being taught in colleges though, and this is a good thing.

    <3

  5. #20
    Sitting in a class room with a book attached to your hip isn't the best way to learn. Anyone who works with children knows this - we are all different, we all take in and process information differently. Just because 'X' works for ten people doesn't mean it's going to work for twenty. You might have in that group of twenty people, five that learn best by being hands on and doing what they are 'learning', away from the classroom.

    Also just to add; 'Americans' aren't afraid of academic study. Allan Bloom's 'The Closing of the American Mind' is an excellent excogitation on what was wrong (what is wrong, and what's going to be wrong) with the American educational institutions.

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Jane Lane View Post
    Personal experience has shown that a lecture, with intensive study have been the best ways to learn and retain new information, along with practice. Practice in math is working out problems, practice in writing is.. writing, chemistry is playing with chemicals..

    There may be other ways to learn, and they are being explored more and more each year. However, because most of these methods are new, it's taking some time to actually teach the teachers how to do these. Classes for "alternative learning" ARE being taught in colleges though, and this is a good thing.

    <3
    There's nothing new under the sun. I'm sure that people used to learn by "doing" and not by sitting in a classroom. So these "alternative" methods really just seem new...like homeschooling seems new when in reality it isn't. Maybe aspects are new due to technology but I'd be willing to bet the basic concepts are not.

    If you learn best by sitting in a lecture, reading a book, and then answering questions about what you read then that's great because that is what education seems to be geared towards.

    But I don't learn best that way, I learn by doing and experiencing. Everything I learned that I needed to know about running my business was self taught, and if I would have tried to sit through classes on it, I would have given up due to sheer boredom.

    And that's what college was to me, 4 years of sheer boredom. Does that mean I am an American afraid of academic study? If you say so.

    But what it means to me is that there is no one size fits all. If you want to sit in a class and learn from a professor how to start a business, marketing techniques, etc that's great. I'd rather skip the boring lectures, do some reading, get some practical experience, and jump start by starting a business, not sitting for 4 years listening to theories on HOW to.

    But since college was fully paid for, I did both. I sat and half way listened but the whole time I was working on my own thing. It's hard for people like me in a college environment. I have a friend who went through something similar.

    It's not that we are afraid and unintelligent, in fact far from it. We don't believe in wasting time. Why drag things out? Why am I sitting here believing that I can only do these things after you tell me I am qualified by passing your tests? Why are you telling me that I can go out and do it now! I can sit through your lectures but at the same time I can gain some practical experience and make money at the same time.

    So if you need 8 hours of school that's great but I bet you my kids would learn more in 4 hours per day.

    That was my experience. To each his own.

  7. #22
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    My son is what is called a hands-on learner. He didn't do well with the sit and listen type learning. As far as what we teach them now, much of it isn't even practical learning anymore. We wonder why kids can't even add up change at Walmart. It all about "If the students pass a test, your school is doing well." But when they leave they know nothing about functioning in the real world.

  8. #23
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    It looks like at least 12 of the 19 schools mentioned in one of your links are either elementary or K-8 schools, which means that a lot of young children are going to need to be kept busy for an extra hour or two per day...

    I can see the potential benefits in the plan, as stated in the link:

    After one year, results have been positive in the 10 participating schools. Each now spends more time on math, literacy and science; integrates enrichment opportunities into the school day to motivate students to learn; and provides teachers with additional time to work, collaborate and plan together.
    If, indeed, there is extra QUALITY time spent on academics and enrichment opportunities, and the teachers have more time to get their own work done rather than having to do so much take-home paperwork, I can see a benefit.

    However, as a homeschooler who is not completely in support of the public educational system anyway, I can also see the drawbacks...more time away from the family home and parental authority, more time for negative socialization and bad influences, more time behind a a desk and less time living life. I realize that in many families there are two working parents, and probably most of these young children would go to after-school programs anyway, so in this situation the added hours of schooling might be a benefit. Bored kids are kids that tend to get in trouble, so if they are kept engaged and interested and learning, rather than wandering their neighborhoods looking for something to do, then I can definitely see a benefit in that.

    So I guess I can see it either way! For some children, and some families, it might be a really good program, especially since the article about the 19 schools stated that most of them are in urban areas. Maybe these are targeting the most at-risk kids, and giving them a boost academically that they could use, as well as keeping them off the street. For other families, I can see the potential negatives.
    ~Mercy
    "Therefore if you have been raised up with Christ,
    keep seeking the things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God.
    Set your mind on the things above, not the things that are on the earth.
    For you have died and your life is hidden with Christ in God."
    Col. 3:1-3

    "Some people think God does not like to be troubled with our constant coming and asking. The way to trouble God is not to come at all." - D.L. Moody

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyndie View Post
    My son is what is called a hands-on learner. He didn't do well with the sit and listen type learning. As far as what we teach them now, much of it isn't even practical learning anymore. We wonder why kids can't even add up change at Walmart. It all about "If the students pass a test, your school is doing well." But when they leave they know nothing about functioning in the real world.
    Yes, that's the catch with the public educational system...it's nearly impossible to meet the individual learning needs and styles of 30 different kids in one classroom. If only there were a way to integrate that, to build curricula around teaching to all different learning styles, and incorporate real life, hands on learning, as the other poster stated above. Don't just talk about starting a business...do it! If that sort of thing was going on with these ELT days, then I can certainly see a distinct benefit to it! But if it's just more desk work, more waiting in lines to talk to the teacher, more mind-numbing textbooks, then I'm not so sure the benefits will outweigh the risks...at least for some kids.
    ~Mercy
    "Therefore if you have been raised up with Christ,
    keep seeking the things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God.
    Set your mind on the things above, not the things that are on the earth.
    For you have died and your life is hidden with Christ in God."
    Col. 3:1-3

    "Some people think God does not like to be troubled with our constant coming and asking. The way to trouble God is not to come at all." - D.L. Moody

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