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Thread: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

  1. #76

    Re: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fenris View Post
    Rather, it is A required way. There were periods when there was no temple and no sacrifice. Since I do not believe that God would leave people without a method of atonement, there must be other ways. In fact, the bible lists many. For example:
    Atonement is not necessarily promised without blood sacrifice, but God can still provide atonement and the sacrifice (e.g. Jesus) at His choosing.

    Genesis 22:8 WEB Abraham said, “God will provide himself the lamb for a burnt offering, my son.” So they both went together.

    Another thought: Yom Kippur brings atonement for all sins. Is this only the sins in the past? Or does it include sins in the future? If the man on the Sabbath was stoned between Yom Kippurs, then perhaps future sins are not included? So if only past sins, does it only atone for sins within that year? Or maybe it can cover past years too? So if there is a future sacrifice, say after the temple is rebuilt, can that cover the current hiatus time? Food for thought.

    Prayer
    1 Kings 8: “If they return to You with all their heart and with all their soul in the land of their enemies who have taken them captive, and pray to You toward their land which You have given to their fathers, the city which You have chosen, and the house which I have built for Your name; then hear their prayer and their supplication in heaven Your dwelling place, and maintain their cause, and forgive Your people who have sinned against You and all their transgressions which they have transgressed against You…”
    Solomon asked this. God did not agree to it. It also seems to refer to a partial captivity, where the temple still stands and sacrifices can still be offered. This was prayer at the dedication of the temple, to ask more blessings related to the temple.

    Turning from one's evil ways:
    Jeremiah 36:"That every man will turn from his evil way, then I will forgive their iniquity and their sin.”
    These words were spoken when the temple was still standing. Just as these words do not negate the rules to fast on Yom Kippur, they do not negate the rules to offer a sacrifice on Yom Kippur.

    Confession:
    Psalms 32: “I acknowledged my sin to You, and my iniquity I did not hide; I said, `I will confess my transgressions to the L-rd’, and You did forgive the guilt of my sin.”
    This is THE king David. I thought we weren't supposed to make rules based on him.

    Combination of above:
    2 Chronicles 7 (mentioned already) “And if My people who are called by My name humble themselves and pray, and seek My face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.”
    As mentioned, 2 Chron. 7:12-15 is in the context of the temple being a house of sacrifice. God listed conditions like plague and drought and famine, but not exile. The temple is likely still standing in the first three conditions.

    Loving kindness and truth
    Proverbs 16: “By loving kindness and truth iniquity is atoned for…”

    And the always awesome Micah 6: With what shall I come before the Lord and bow down before the exalted God? Shall I come before him with burnt offerings, with calves a year old? Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, with ten thousand rivers of olive oil? Shall I offer my firstborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?
    He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.
    Unless you're going to say that these verses are meaningless, it seems perfectly clear that God gave many avenues of atonement aside from sacrifice. In fact, absent a change of heart, even sacrifice is completely useless.

    Proverbs 15: “The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord.”[/quote]

    Again, these were spoken when the temple was standing. The offerings at Yom Kippur could be assumed. Change of heart is vital, I agree.

    Again, doesn't say it's the only way, only a way. Given that the temple wouldn't always stand, God had to give others. And He did, very explicitly, in the bible.
    A future Yom Kippur / sacrifice of Jesus.

    Poetically? Sure, why not.

    Ah. So this takes us to the translation of the word "Kohen". It does usually mean "priest", but not always. In fact, in 2 Samuel 8 it says that king David's sons were "Kohanim". Obviously they weren't priests, who could only come from the line of Levi, through Aaron. So the word can mean something else, in this case "chief officers" or "leaders". OK, so bear with me here. The Psalm says that David will be a "priest" in the order of Malkitzedek. Malkitzedek was a priest, but he was also the king of Salem (i.e. Jerusalem). So the Levites chanting Psalm 110 are singing that God promised their master, king David, that he would be a "priest" that is to say, the king of Jerusalem, forever.

    See, very simple. Doesn't require any new theology.
    So you think David will be a priest, ahem official, actually the king of Jerusalem, forever! Isn't it the Messiah who will be king forever? (Isa. 9:6-7; Dan. 7:13-14) Are you suggesting there will be two kings forever?

    Zechariah 6:11 Yes, take silver and gold, and make crowns, and set them on the head of Joshua the son of Jehozadak, the high priest; 12 and speak to him, saying, ‘Yahweh of Armies says, “Behold, the man whose name is the Branch: and he shall grow up out of his place; and he shall build Yahweh’s temple; 13 even he shall build Yahweh’s temple; and he shall bear the glory, and shall sit and rule on his throne; and he shall be a priest on his throne; and the counsel of peace shall be between them both.

    Zechariah tells us there will be a king and priest in the future.


    They were, and will be again in the third temple envisioned by Ezekiel. But God did provide other avenues.
    ok

    So God forgave him. It doesn't magically undo what happened. King David also wasn't permitted to build the temple on account of the blood that he spilled. So there was still consequence.
    David was not permitted to build the temple in 2 Sam. 7. He murdered in 2 Sam. 11. There were other consequences in his family.
    But if God can forgive sins against others, then Yom Kippur should also cover sins against others, because God promised to forgive all sins.

    And then perhaps the execution atones?
    Atones for land.

    Numbers 35:33 “‘So you shall not pollute the land in which you are; for blood pollutes the land. No atonement can be made for the land for the blood that is shed in it, but by the blood of him who shed it.

  2. #77
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    Re: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

    Quote Originally Posted by greenonions View Post
    Atonement is not necessarily promised without blood sacrifice, but God can still provide atonement and the sacrifice (e.g. Jesus) at His choosing.

    Genesis 22:8 WEB Abraham said, “God will provide himself the lamb for a burnt offering, my son.” So they both went together.
    Completely out of context. Allow me to explain. Abraham was ordered to bring up his son as an "olah" sacrifice, and this verse repeats that. The phrase "burnt offering" in this verse is "olah". And the Olah sacrifice is not a sin sacrifice. Allow me to repeat that:
    the Olah sacrifice is not a sin sacrifice. Leviticus 22:18 says it's brought as a donation to God. It has absolutely nothing to do with sin.


    Another thought: Yom Kippur brings atonement for all sins. Is this only the sins in the past? Or does it include sins in the future?
    Only past sins. How does one atone for something that hasn't even happened yet? That's just playing games with God.

    If the man on the Sabbath was stoned between Yom Kippurs, then perhaps future sins are not included?
    You still haven't explained why God didn't just tell the man to bring a sacrifice, since you seem to think sacrifice atones for all sins.

    So if only past sins, does it only atone for sins within that year? Or maybe it can cover past years too?
    I would say any past sins.
    So if there is a future sacrifice, say after the temple is rebuilt, can that cover the current hiatus time? Food for thought.
    Yes, but again, sacrifice is really only for accidental sin.



    Solomon asked this. God did not agree to it.
    Was Solomon not a prophet? God's "son"?



    These words were spoken when the temple was still standing.
    So what? This is God talking. He's saying if you turn from your evil ways, He will forgive your sin. He's not qualifying it with any other conditions. Why are you adding them? And Christians accuse the Pharisees of being legalistic.


    Just as these words do not negate the rules to fast on Yom Kippur, they do not negate the rules to offer a sacrifice on Yom Kippur.
    But sacrifice can't be brought. There's no temple. Shortly after Jeremiah uttered these words, in fact.



    This is THE king David. I thought we weren't supposed to make rules based on him.
    OK, chuck it out.



    As mentioned, 2 Chron. 7:12-15 is in the context of the temple being a house of sacrifice. God listed conditions like plague and drought and famine, but not exile. The temple is likely still standing in the first three conditions.
    Again, you're being hyper legalistic. Doesn't say anything whatsoever about sacrifice. In fact, the next verse says something even more interesting:
    My eyes will be open and My ears attentive to the prayer of this place.

    "Prayer". Not "sacrifice".


    Again, these were spoken when the temple was standing. The offerings at Yom Kippur could be assumed. Change of heart is vital, I agree.
    Micah specifically says that God doesn't want sacrifice. And you keep insisting that He does. Who should I listen to, you, or God?


    A future Yom Kippur / sacrifice of Jesus.
    No, that's not explicit. If you choose to believe it, fine.



    So you think David will be a priest, ahem official, actually the king of Jerusalem, forever!
    His line, yes. Unlike Saul, who had the kingship but his it was taken from him and his family. So God promising this to David, in the same generation that Saul lost it, well that's a huge promise.


    Isn't it the Messiah who will be king forever? (Isa. 9:6-7;
    Not about the messiah.
    Dan. 7:13-14) Are you suggesting there will be two kings forever?
    Doesn't say he'll be king forever, only that the kingdom won't be destroyed.

    even he shall build Yahweh’s temple; and he shall bear the glory, and shall sit and rule on his throne; and he shall be a priest on his throne; and the counsel of peace shall be between them both.

    Zechariah tells us there will be a king and priest in the future.
    Yes. A king and a priest. Two different people. And there will be peace between them.



    David was not permitted to build the temple in 2 Sam. 7. He murdered in 2 Sam. 11. There were other consequences in his family.
    But if God can forgive sins against others, then Yom Kippur should also cover sins against others, because God promised to forgive all sins.
    Really, God promised to forgive all sins? Where was that exactly?


    Atones for land.
    I don't even know what that means. "Atones for land". Land is not sin.
    "For a small moment have I forsaken you, and with great mercy will I gather you.With a little wrath did I hide My countenance for a moment from you, and with everlasting kindness will I have compassion on you," said your Redeemer, the Lord."..."For the mountains shall depart and the hills totter, but My kindness shall not depart from you, neither shall the covenant of My peace totter," says the Lord, Who has compassion on you.

    Isaiah 54

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    Re: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fenris View Post
    Completely out of context. Allow me to explain. Abraham was ordered to bring up his son as an "olah" sacrifice, and this verse repeats that. The phrase "burnt offering" in this verse is "olah". And the Olah sacrifice is not a sin sacrifice. Allow me to repeat that: [LEFT][COLOR=#222222][FONT=Verdana]the Olah sacrifice is not a sin sacrifice. Leviticus 22:18 says it's brought as a donation to God. It has absolutely nothing to do with sin.

    .
    Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't the entire idea of the Olah to draw near to God?

    Here's what I thought:

    Burnt offering: Sweet aroma / voluntary / Olah
    Grain offering: Sweet aroma / voluntary / Minchah
    Peace offering: Sweet aroma / voluntary / selemim

    Done in communion with God

    Sin offering: Not a sweet aroma / mandatory / chattath
    Trespass offering: Not a sweet aroma / mandatory / asam

    Done for communion with God
    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

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    Re: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

    The Hebrew word "korban", "sacrifice", has the root "KRV", "to come close". So yes. But there are different kinds, which most Christians seem completely unaware of. It's all sin sacrifice to Christians, even though (as you well know, Keck) many sacrifices have nothing whatsoever to do with sin. The Olah that Abraham was bringing was not a sin sacrifice.
    "For a small moment have I forsaken you, and with great mercy will I gather you.With a little wrath did I hide My countenance for a moment from you, and with everlasting kindness will I have compassion on you," said your Redeemer, the Lord."..."For the mountains shall depart and the hills totter, but My kindness shall not depart from you, neither shall the covenant of My peace totter," says the Lord, Who has compassion on you.

    Isaiah 54

  5. #80

    Re: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fenris View Post
    Completely out of context. Allow me to explain. Abraham was ordered to bring up his son as an "olah" sacrifice, and this verse repeats that. The phrase "burnt offering" in this verse is "olah". And the Olah sacrifice is not a sin sacrifice. Allow me to repeat that:
    the Olah sacrifice is not a sin sacrifice. Leviticus 22:18 says it's brought as a donation to God. It has absolutely nothing to do with sin.
    Thanks for your thorough replies. I understood that the burnt offering is different from the sin offering. My point was that God can provide a sacrifice if people cannot. As for whether the burnt offering can be related to sin, consider this:

    Job 1:5 WEB It was so, when the days of their feasting had run their course, that Job sent and sanctified them, and rose up early in the morning, and offered burnt offerings according to the number of them all. For Job said, “It may be that my sons have sinned, and renounced God in their hearts.” Job did so continually.

    Only past sins. How does one atone for something that hasn't even happened yet? That's just playing games with God.
    You may be aware that Christians believe Jesus' sacrifice atones for all time. The concept is that everyone who identifies with Jesus past and future also shares in His punishment.

    You still haven't explained why God didn't just tell the man to bring a sacrifice, since you seem to think sacrifice atones for all sins.
    I thought I explained this. Of the sacrifices in the Law of Moses, only the Yom Kippur sacrifice atoned for all sins. The man can't just bring a Yom Kippur sacrifice at any time.
    Levicitus 16:30 for on this day shall atonement be made for you, to cleanse you; from all your sins you shall be clean before Yahweh.

    I would say any past sins.
    So when the temple is unavailable, there can still be future atonement that covers that time period.

    Yes, but again, sacrifice is really only for accidental sin.
    For the sin offering in general yes. For most cases of the guilt offering, except cheating and stealing. There are no such qualifications in Leviticus 16:30.

    Was Solomon not a prophet? God's "son"?
    God doesn't always say yes to prayer. God said no to Moses regarding entering Canaan and no to David regarding building the temple.

    So what? This is God talking. He's saying if you turn from your evil ways, He will forgive your sin. He's not qualifying it with any other conditions. Why are you adding them? And Christians accuse the Pharisees of being legalistic.
    We could quote Ezekiel 33:11, which was written when Judah was in exile in Babylon. I guess we agree that during exile, God will forgive without sacrifice. The question is: does God intend that a sacrifice will be offered for these sins in the future? I think yes and you think there is no need.

    Ezekiel 33:11 Tell them, As I live, says the Lord Yahweh, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked; but that the wicked turn from his way and live: turn, turn from your evil ways; for why will you die, house of Israel?

    But sacrifice can't be brought. There's no temple. Shortly after Jeremiah uttered these words, in fact.
    The temple was still standing when Jeremiah said these words, but I guess they didn't listen.

    OK, chuck it out.
    No need to chuck it out. I was just poking fun at your exceptions for king David.

    Again, you're being hyper legalistic. Doesn't say anything whatsoever about sacrifice. In fact, the next verse says something even more interesting:
    My eyes will be open and My ears attentive to the prayer of this place.

    "Prayer". Not "sacrifice".
    Prayer of this place.

    Micah specifically says that God doesn't want sacrifice. And you keep insisting that He does. Who should I listen to, you, or God?
    God doesn't need excess burnt offerings or human sacrifices. The law of Moses was still in effect and required regular sacrifices at that time. God definitely prefers obedience over sacrifice.

    1 Sam. 15:22 Samuel said, “Has Yahweh as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying Yahweh’s voice? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to listen than the fat of rams.


    No, that's not explicit. If you choose to believe it, fine.
    Yes, it's not explicit, but neither is your statement about atonement without sacrifice: "Given that the temple wouldn't always stand, God had to give others".

    His line, yes. Unlike Saul, who had the kingship but his it was taken from him and his family. So God promising this to David, in the same generation that Saul lost it, well that's a huge promise.

    Not about the messiah.
    Doesn't say he'll be king forever, only that the kingdom won't be destroyed.
    So that's how you understand it.

    Yes. A king and a priest. Two different people. And there will be peace between them.
    Zechariah 6:13 ...he shall be a priest on his throne (Sounds like one person to me)


    Really, God promised to forgive all sins? Where was that exactly?
    See Leviticus 16:30 above.


    I don't even know what that means. "Atones for land". Land is not sin.
    The land can be defiled.

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    Re: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

    Quote Originally Posted by greenonions View Post
    Thanks for your thorough replies.
    Of course! And thank you for yours, as well.

    I understood that the burnt offering is different from the sin offering. My point was that God can provide a sacrifice if people cannot.
    Again, has nothing to do with the passage your brought up about Abraham talking to Isaac. That was not a sin sacrifice.


    As for whether the burnt offering can be related to sin, consider this:

    Job 1:5 WEB It was so, when the days of their feasting had run their course, that Job sent and sanctified them, and rose up early in the morning, and offered burnt offerings according to the number of them all. For Job said, “It may be that my sons have sinned, and renounced God in their hearts.” Job did so continually.
    There's no disagreement that one way of atonement for certain sins can be a sacrifice. Our disagreement is if it applies to all sin, or if it's the only possible method of atonement.


    You may be aware that Christians believe Jesus' sacrifice atones for all time. The concept is that everyone who identifies with Jesus past and future also shares in His punishment.
    I am aware.

    I thought I explained this. Of the sacrifices in the Law of Moses, only the Yom Kippur sacrifice atoned for all sins. The man can't just bring a Yom Kippur sacrifice at any time.
    Levicitus 16:30 for on this day shall atonement be made for you, to cleanse you; from all your sins you shall be clean before Yahweh.
    So great. Why not leave the guy alive until Yom Kippur?

    Although again, Numbers specifically says that there's no sacrifice for willful, defiant, and intentional sins.


    So when the temple is unavailable, there can still be future atonement that covers that time period.
    No. A person has to bring the sacrifice themselves. They're long dead. So perhaps God made other methods of atonement for those times when there was no sacrifice. Or perhaps He made other methods for sins that aren't forgiven via sacrifice.


    For the sin offering in general yes. For most cases of the guilt offering, except cheating and stealing. There are no such qualifications in Leviticus 16:30.
    And yet Numbers 15:30 says there is no atonement for intentional sin.


    God doesn't always say yes to prayer. God said no to Moses regarding entering Canaan and no to David regarding building the temple.
    But God didn't say "no" here.



    We could quote Ezekiel 33:11, which was written when Judah was in exile in Babylon. I guess we agree that during exile, God will forgive without sacrifice.
    Great. I am in full agreement. If God could forgive sin without sacrifice then, why not also now?



    The question is: does God intend that a sacrifice will be offered for these sins in the future? I think yes and you think there is no need.
    Yup. I guess we'll always be in disagreement here.


    No need to chuck it out. I was just poking fun at your exceptions for king David.
    I still see king David as the exception. He was a unique individual.



    Prayer of this place.
    And Jews go to pray there, because it is a special and holy place


    God doesn't need excess burnt offerings or human sacrifices. The law of Moses was still in effect and required regular sacrifices at that time. God definitely prefers obedience over sacrifice.

    1 Sam. 15:22 Samuel said, “Has Yahweh as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying Yahweh’s voice? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to listen than the fat of rams.
    Again, agree.

    Maybe we're less far apart than we think...
    Yes, it's not explicit, but neither is your statement about atonement without sacrifice: "Given that the temple wouldn't always stand, God had to give others".
    But God did explicitly give other ways.

    So that's how you understand it.
    It is.


    Zechariah 6:13 ...he shall be a priest on his throne (Sounds like one person to me)
    And he shall sit and rule on his throne, and the priest shall be on his throne. And a counsel of peace shall be between them.

    Sounds like two guys.
    "For a small moment have I forsaken you, and with great mercy will I gather you.With a little wrath did I hide My countenance for a moment from you, and with everlasting kindness will I have compassion on you," said your Redeemer, the Lord."..."For the mountains shall depart and the hills totter, but My kindness shall not depart from you, neither shall the covenant of My peace totter," says the Lord, Who has compassion on you.

    Isaiah 54

  7. #82

    Re: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fenris View Post
    Of course! And thank you for yours, as well.

    Again, has nothing to do with the passage your brought up about Abraham talking to Isaac. That was not a sin sacrifice.

    There's no disagreement that one way of atonement for certain sins can be a sacrifice. Our disagreement is if it applies to all sin, or if it's the only possible method of atonement.

    I am aware.

    So great. Why not leave the guy alive until Yom Kippur?

    Although again, Numbers specifically says that there's no sacrifice for willful, defiant, and intentional sins.
    Numbers 15:22-29 talks about sacrifice for unintentional sin that can be atoned for with a sin offering for the congregation or an individual. Num. 15:30-31 prescribes the death penalty for sinning in a high-handed manner. Here, sins that are committed with a high hand, suggesting a proud defiance of God, are punished with capital punishment. Such a person cannot offer a regular sin offering that could secure forgiveness for unintentional sins and release from punishment (Num. 15:27-31). But this does not rule out the effectiveness of the sacrifices on the Day of Atonement to atone for transgressions, iniquities, and all sins. However, people who sin with a high hand could be killed before the Day of Atonement, and the sacrifice on that day is only effective for the people who afflict their souls (Lev. 23:27-32)—something foreign to most people who proudly defy God. Note also that sinning with a high hand does not include all intentional sins, for sins such as refusing to testify as a witness (Lev. 5:1), theft (Lev. 6:2), extortion (Lev. 6:2), lying about something found and swearing falsely about it (Lev. 6:3) have associated sacrifices prescribed for them.

    No. A person has to bring the sacrifice themselves. They're long dead. So perhaps God made other methods of atonement for those times when there was no sacrifice. Or perhaps He made other methods for sins that aren't forgiven via sacrifice.
    Actually, the high priest can offer the sacrifice on behalf of the whole nation, without the individual even being in Jerusalem. People need to be in Jerusalem for Passover, Pentecost, and Sukkot, but this rule is missing for Yom Kippur. I think Yom Kippur only atones for the sins of people who afflict their souls and do not work--otherwise they get destroyed (Lev. 23:29-30). I'm not sure how things work when someone is long dead though. I think there is hope for people who are repentant before they die.

    And yet Numbers 15:30 says there is no atonement for intentional sin.
    See above

    But God didn't say "no" here.
    True, and He didn't say "yes" either.

    Great. I am in full agreement. If God could forgive sin without sacrifice then, why not also now?
    God can forgive now. Sins that are confessed could be forgiven. The main sin today of Jews who do not believe in Jesus is the sin of unbelief. Sadly, that sin is often not confessed.

    John 15:22 NIV If I [Jesus] had not come and spoken to them, they would not be guilty of sin; but now they have no excuse for their sin. 23 Whoever hates me hates my Father as well. 24 If I had not done among them the works no one else did, they would not be guilty of sin. As it is, they have seen, and yet they have hated both me and my Father. ... 16:8 When he [the Holy Spirit] comes, he will prove the world to be in the wrong about sin and righteousness and judgment: 9 about sin, because people do not believe in me;

    Yup. I guess we'll always be in disagreement here.
    At least we understand each other a little better.

    I still see king David as the exception. He was a unique individual.

    And Jews go to pray there, because it is a special and holy place
    A place chosen as a temple for sacrifices (2 Chron. 7:12). Yes, a special place.

    Again, agree.

    Maybe we're less far apart than we think...
    I hope that means that we're both on the right track for the things we agree on.

    But God did explicitly give other ways.

    It is.

    And he shall sit and rule on his throne, and the priest shall be on his throne. And a counsel of peace shall be between them.

    Sounds like two guys.
    Some translations have the king becoming the priest, while others just have "there will be a priest" on his throne. The repetition of "his throne" sounds like the same throne, but arguably it could refer to two different thrones. If the same throne, there are two people sitting on it (or one). If different thrones, what is a priest doing on a throne? I've always associated the word throne with kingship, but 1 Sam. 1:9 does mention Eli the priest sitting on a throne (also Bathsheba as the queen mother, the Shunnamite woman made one for Elisha, wisdom personified in Proverbs 9:14 had a throne).

    May you find atonement!

    Joy floods my soul for Jesus has saved me,
    Freed me from sin that long had enslaved me
    His precious blood, He came to redeem,
    Now I belong to Him;
    (Norman J. Clayton)

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    Re: Are we to be slaves to the Law of God?

    Quote Originally Posted by greenonions View Post
    Numbers 15:22-29 talks about sacrifice for unintentional sin that can be atoned for with a sin offering for the congregation or an individual. Num. 15:30-31 prescribes the death penalty for sinning in a high-handed manner. Here, sins that are committed with a high hand, suggesting a proud defiance of God, are punished with capital punishment. Such a person cannot offer a regular sin offering that could secure forgiveness for unintentional sins and release from punishment (Num. 15:27-31). But this does not rule out the effectiveness of the sacrifices on the Day of Atonement to atone for transgressions, iniquities, and all sins. However, people who sin with a high hand could be killed before the Day of Atonement, and the sacrifice on that day is only effective for the people who afflict their souls (Lev. 23:27-32)—something foreign to most people who proudly defy God.
    Irrelevant to this point. The verse doesn't give any out for the intentional sinner. It doesn't say "wait for Yom Kippur." So to wrangle the text to mean what you say strikes me as being extremely legalistic, which is again, the "crime" the Pharisees are accused of.


    Note also that sinning with a high hand does not include all intentional sins, for sins such as refusing to testify as a witness (Lev. 5:1), theft (Lev. 6:2), extortion (Lev. 6:2), lying about something found and swearing falsely about it (Lev. 6:3) have associated sacrifices prescribed for them.
    And some intentional crimes don't. Murders and sabbath violators get the death penalty. If someone commits a murder or heck violates the sabbath rules that apply to Yom Kippur, or even eats on Yom Kippur, why does the sacrifice not atone? Or maybe Yom Kippur is a sort of free for all day, when one can commit any sins they desire since they're already forgiven?

    Actually, the high priest can offer the sacrifice on behalf of the whole nation, without the individual even being in Jerusalem. People need to be in Jerusalem for Passover, Pentecost, and Sukkot, but this rule is missing for Yom Kippur. I think Yom Kippur only atones for the sins of people who afflict their souls and do not work--otherwise they get destroyed (Lev. 23:29-30).
    Great, more agreement.

    True, and He didn't say "yes" either.
    Silence is the voice of complicity. This isn't some random person making statements, its the king of Israel who also happens to be a prophet. To dismiss that is...I don't even know what.


    God can forgive now. Sins that are confessed could be forgiven. The main sin today of Jews who do not believe in Jesus is the sin of unbelief. Sadly, that sin is often not confessed.
    So then Jesus's sacrifice is actually unnecessary. God can forgive anyone He likes.




    A place chosen as a temple for sacrifices (2 Chron. 7:12). Yes, a special place.
    But God says He'll hear the prayer from there. Not the sacrifice. Words mean something.


    I hope that means that we're both on the right track for the things we agree on.
    I am absolutely certain that we are.



    Some translations have the king becoming the priest, while others just have "there will be a priest" on his throne.
    I'm not using a translation. I'm reading it in the original Klingon, err, Hebrew.

    The repetition of "his throne" sounds like the same throne, but arguably it could refer to two different thrones. If the same throne, there are two people sitting on it (or one). If different thrones, what is a priest doing on a throne?
    Well the verse plainly says the king will be on his throne, and the priest on his throne, and there will be peace between them. If it's the same person, why would there be "peace between them"? Is he schizophrenic? Suffer from multiple personality disorder?

    Biblically, in some ways kings and priests are alike. They both have a coronation, at which they are anointed. They both are (theoretically) a chief executive of a sort. They both typically inherit their position.

    May you find atonement!
    Amen! Thank you. Yom Kippur begins tonight at sundown.
    "For a small moment have I forsaken you, and with great mercy will I gather you.With a little wrath did I hide My countenance for a moment from you, and with everlasting kindness will I have compassion on you," said your Redeemer, the Lord."..."For the mountains shall depart and the hills totter, but My kindness shall not depart from you, neither shall the covenant of My peace totter," says the Lord, Who has compassion on you.

    Isaiah 54

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