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Thread: Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

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    Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

    Are the Jewish High Holy days for all believers?

    The reason that I have begun this writing with “Jewish” High holy days is because this is what most of Christendom believe when the holy days of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkot are mentioned. But in reality, they are “God’s” Holy days for ALL believers. Why do I say this? Let’s keep on reading.
    In Genesis 1:14 Elohim says; “and God said, let there be lights in the firmament of the heavens to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs and for seasons”
    This is not talking about the 4 seasons of Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. The Hebrew word “seasons” here is “Moedim” which means “appointed times when God instructs man to come to worship” these are special times with special meanings.
    Elohim originally called his people Israel to celebrate these appointed times, yet when they came out of Egypt, not only did members of the 12 tribes come out but also many Egyptians and probably Nubians as well followed the Israelites out. They became part of Israel by their own choice. God made a covenant with his people, and He also had in mind these peoples who followed the true God, YHVH.
    In Deuteronomy 29:10-15, Adonai speaks through Moshe stating that everyone that was standing that day, from the most important person down to the lowliest common laborer, standing before Adonai were being made HIS PEOPLE, and he mentions in verse 11; “your little ones, your wives, and thy stranger that is in thy camp” the mention of the word “stranger” usually means one who is not of the 12 tribes, “that thou should enter into covenant with YHVH thy Elohim. He included ALL into his covenant to be HIS people.
    From that time up til now, the people of the 12 tribes have been spread out over all the earth and from the original 12 tribes, the Ashkenazim, Sephardim, and the Falashim groups have been formed whose roots are in Israel, yet they are from the nations of East Europe, Spain and Middle East, and Africa.
    Christendom may be divided up into denominations, but we are all still part of the Commonwealth/community of Israel, extended outward into the world. So, we can well say that all the appointed days of Adonai are for ALL believers and followers in Yeshua/Jesus. So, these are not “Jewish” appointed days, but “God’s” appointed days.
    From September 9th to the end of this month we are celebrating Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkot. How do these appointed days point to Yeshua? To be very brief, we could say the following;
    The sound of the trumpet or shofar which is heard on Rosh Hashanah, or Yom Teruah marks the time of repentance
    and inner reflection. It reminds us that the “King is coming” and for us to ready our hearts and minds. It is time for us to “Shoov” or “return” to HIM who redeemed us from the curse of sin. If we have fallen short of the mark, we should take better aim and point ourselves back to our relationship with Yeshua.
    Yes, we all sin and come short, yet God invites all repentant sinners to come home. The father welcomed his wayward son who had gone astray. He was returning home. He was “part” of the family already, he had just gone astray and realized the error of his ways, and returned into the arms of his beloved father.
    Repentance in the Hebrew is “Teshuvah” which means “a return” or “change of mind and heart.” As we think and ponder upon our relationship with our Savior. We come to “Yom Kippur” or the “Day of Atonement”
    Under the old covenant, the high priest could come only once a year into the “Holy of Holies” in the Tabernacle and later in the temple. That was where the “Aron HaKodesh” was kept, the “Holy of Holies” in this box were the tablets of the commandments. The high priest sprinkled blood on the mercy seat and when the “Shekinah” or the “Holy Spirit” looked down upon the mercy seat, he saw the blood of innocent animals and not the broken commandments.
    Yet this was only temporary, as the blood of animals could not really atone for sin, only “cover” sin. The animal blood points us to the blood that really counts, to the blood of Yeshua, whose one time only sacrifice on the cross not only covered our sins but paid the entire price of sin, eternal separation from God. His blood for our salvation. We are now rejoined with God and not separated from God.
    During Yom Kippur, two goats were brought to the priest. One was sacrificed and the other sent away. A priest placed his hands on the goat’s head, symbolically placing all of our sins onto the goat. The other goat was sacrificed
    What does this ceremony mean? It means that just as our sins were dealt with on the cross, they are also “driven away from us” never to be remembered, never to return upon our heads.
    The words “Yom Kippur” mean “day” (Yom) “Kippur” comes from “Kafar” meaning “covering” or also “Yom Hakipurim” (Day of the coverings) because more than one animal was sacrificed at this time. So, it wasn’t a singular “blood” (dam) but “Bloods” (damei) therefore “coverings.” Yet Yeshua’s blood was unique and ONE (one of a kind)
    Sinless and perfect. Just like Adam had when he was originally made in the image of Elohim.
    It is also a day of prayer and fasting, when the Word of God says; “afflicting one’s soul” it is a time of taking note of our sinful state, and spend the day in fasting. This year, Yom Kippur starts the evening of Sept 18 and ends the evening of Sept 19th. In mainline Jewish belief, the books that God has concerning people are closed. The state of the soul in written in those books and it will be so for one year. However, we know that the books are “always open” since the line from man to God is open 24-7 for repentance. Yeshua’s death on the cross is for all time.
    The final appointed day is “Sukkot” or the “Feast of Tabernacles”. This is a time of joy, gladness, rejoicing that the “King is here”. We can look at Rosh Hashanah as saying; the king is coming, get ready, Yom Kippur we could say “the King is at the door, really get ready, if you need to repent, do it now! then Sukkot would mean; “The King is here, he has come, so rejoice!”
    This festival of “Tabernacles” symbolizes the coming of God to this earth. A “tabernacle” is a dwelling place, usually a temporary dwelling place like a tent. YHVH came down first to his people on Sinai, in a cloud of fire and smoke on top of Mt. Sinai. There he invited Moshe up to commune with him, he gave him the commandments for HIS people. Then he came down all the way to rest on the “Mishkan” (The Tabernacle) in a cloud by day and a column of fire by night. He led his people through the desert for 40 years. Eventually, the tabernacle was replaced by the Temple.
    Then YHVH came to earth in the form of flesh and blood, as a man, as God-man, as Yeshua. He came around this time towards the end of September or early October. This can be proved mathematically. I am not going into “Christmas bashing” at this time, but December 25th was set aside in ancient times by Rome to commemorate the festival of Saturnalia. It celebrates the birthdate of all the pagan gods of Rome.
    Sukkot is a seven-day celebration, culminating on the 7th day as “Hoshana Raba” the great day of the feast. This was when Yeshua was in the temple and said; “whoever comes to me from him will flow rivers of living water” The priests at that time poured out near the altar water and wine, as Yeshua poured out his blood mixed with water on the cross, when the Roman soldier stuck a spear in his side. During this festival was when Solomon dedicated the temple.
    On the 8th day, it is a time to rejoice in the Torah, that we have God’s Word in our midst.
    The Hanukkah lights are lit for 8 days to remind us of the dedication of the first temple, and also to remind us that today we are the temple of YHVH. Our bodies contain the Holy Spirit as the Spirit of God at one time inhabited the Tabernacle and the temple.
    The entire chapter of Leviticus 23 speaks of the “appointed days” set aside to worship and to get right with Him.
    Of course, it is the choice of every believer to either celebrate or not to celebrate these days. Life is all about choices. We can either ignore these days or celebrate these days. We should not judge our brother or sister if he or she chooses not to. We are saved by grace through Yeshua, not through observance of the commandments. However, if we love the LORD we will want to do as He commands in scripture.
    If you want some detailed info on these Holy Days, you can go to www.hebrew4christians.com. When you go to that site, look to the left and under “home” look for and click on “Holidays” and you can get detailed info under the
    “Days of Awe” .

    Shalom Rabbi Ben Avraham

  2. #2

    Re: Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

    I am of the camp that says, "We don't HAVE to... we GET to, now that we've been grafted in by our Messiah!" For our house, if I am going to celebrate a Holiday (Holy Day), it will be one of God's setup and not necessarily one who's roots are blended in paganism...but I do not begrudge those who think differently...
    Jesus said, "Out of the hardness of your hearts Moses gave a writ of divorce; but from the beginning it was not so." How many more things do you suppose are, "From the beginning, NOT so?"

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    Re: Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yakov View Post
    Are the Jewish High Holy days for all believers?

    The reason that I have begun this writing with “Jewish” High holy days is because this is what most of Christendom believe when the holy days of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkot are mentioned. But in reality, they are “God’s” Holy days for ALL believers. Why do I say this? Let’s keep on reading.
    In Genesis 1:14 Elohim says; “and God said, let there be lights in the firmament of the heavens to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs and for seasons”
    This is not talking about the 4 seasons of Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. The Hebrew word “seasons” here is “Moedim” which means “appointed times when God instructs man to come to worship” these are special times with special meanings.
    Elohim originally called his people Israel to celebrate these appointed times, yet when they came out of Egypt, not only did members of the 12 tribes come out but also many Egyptians and probably Nubians as well followed the Israelites out. They became part of Israel by their own choice. God made a covenant with his people, and He also had in mind these peoples who followed the true God, YHVH.
    In Deuteronomy 29:10-15, Adonai speaks through Moshe stating that everyone that was standing that day, from the most important person down to the lowliest common laborer, standing before Adonai were being made HIS PEOPLE, and he mentions in verse 11; “your little ones, your wives, and thy stranger that is in thy camp” the mention of the word “stranger” usually means one who is not of the 12 tribes, “that thou should enter into covenant with YHVH thy Elohim. He included ALL into his covenant to be HIS people.
    From that time up til now, the people of the 12 tribes have been spread out over all the earth and from the original 12 tribes, the Ashkenazim, Sephardim, and the Falashim groups have been formed whose roots are in Israel, yet they are from the nations of East Europe, Spain and Middle East, and Africa.
    Christendom may be divided up into denominations, but we are all still part of the Commonwealth/community of Israel, extended outward into the world. So, we can well say that all the appointed days of Adonai are for ALL believers and followers in Yeshua/Jesus. So, these are not “Jewish” appointed days, but “God’s” appointed days.
    From September 9th to the end of this month we are celebrating Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkot. How do these appointed days point to Yeshua? To be very brief, we could say the following;
    The sound of the trumpet or shofar which is heard on Rosh Hashanah, or Yom Teruah marks the time of repentance
    and inner reflection. It reminds us that the “King is coming” and for us to ready our hearts and minds. It is time for us to “Shoov” or “return” to HIM who redeemed us from the curse of sin. If we have fallen short of the mark, we should take better aim and point ourselves back to our relationship with Yeshua.
    Yes, we all sin and come short, yet God invites all repentant sinners to come home. The father welcomed his wayward son who had gone astray. He was returning home. He was “part” of the family already, he had just gone astray and realized the error of his ways, and returned into the arms of his beloved father.
    Repentance in the Hebrew is “Teshuvah” which means “a return” or “change of mind and heart.” As we think and ponder upon our relationship with our Savior. We come to “Yom Kippur” or the “Day of Atonement”
    Under the old covenant, the high priest could come only once a year into the “Holy of Holies” in the Tabernacle and later in the temple. That was where the “Aron HaKodesh” was kept, the “Holy of Holies” in this box were the tablets of the commandments. The high priest sprinkled blood on the mercy seat and when the “Shekinah” or the “Holy Spirit” looked down upon the mercy seat, he saw the blood of innocent animals and not the broken commandments.
    Yet this was only temporary, as the blood of animals could not really atone for sin, only “cover” sin. The animal blood points us to the blood that really counts, to the blood of Yeshua, whose one time only sacrifice on the cross not only covered our sins but paid the entire price of sin, eternal separation from God. His blood for our salvation. We are now rejoined with God and not separated from God.
    During Yom Kippur, two goats were brought to the priest. One was sacrificed and the other sent away. A priest placed his hands on the goat’s head, symbolically placing all of our sins onto the goat. The other goat was sacrificed
    What does this ceremony mean? It means that just as our sins were dealt with on the cross, they are also “driven away from us” never to be remembered, never to return upon our heads.
    The words “Yom Kippur” mean “day” (Yom) “Kippur” comes from “Kafar” meaning “covering” or also “Yom Hakipurim” (Day of the coverings) because more than one animal was sacrificed at this time. So, it wasn’t a singular “blood” (dam) but “Bloods” (damei) therefore “coverings.” Yet Yeshua’s blood was unique and ONE (one of a kind)
    Sinless and perfect. Just like Adam had when he was originally made in the image of Elohim.
    It is also a day of prayer and fasting, when the Word of God says; “afflicting one’s soul” it is a time of taking note of our sinful state, and spend the day in fasting. This year, Yom Kippur starts the evening of Sept 18 and ends the evening of Sept 19th. In mainline Jewish belief, the books that God has concerning people are closed. The state of the soul in written in those books and it will be so for one year. However, we know that the books are “always open” since the line from man to God is open 24-7 for repentance. Yeshua’s death on the cross is for all time.
    The final appointed day is “Sukkot” or the “Feast of Tabernacles”. This is a time of joy, gladness, rejoicing that the “King is here”. We can look at Rosh Hashanah as saying; the king is coming, get ready, Yom Kippur we could say “the King is at the door, really get ready, if you need to repent, do it now! then Sukkot would mean; “The King is here, he has come, so rejoice!”
    This festival of “Tabernacles” symbolizes the coming of God to this earth. A “tabernacle” is a dwelling place, usually a temporary dwelling place like a tent. YHVH came down first to his people on Sinai, in a cloud of fire and smoke on top of Mt. Sinai. There he invited Moshe up to commune with him, he gave him the commandments for HIS people. Then he came down all the way to rest on the “Mishkan” (The Tabernacle) in a cloud by day and a column of fire by night. He led his people through the desert for 40 years. Eventually, the tabernacle was replaced by the Temple.
    Then YHVH came to earth in the form of flesh and blood, as a man, as God-man, as Yeshua. He came around this time towards the end of September or early October. This can be proved mathematically. I am not going into “Christmas bashing” at this time, but December 25th was set aside in ancient times by Rome to commemorate the festival of Saturnalia. It celebrates the birthdate of all the pagan gods of Rome.
    Sukkot is a seven-day celebration, culminating on the 7th day as “Hoshana Raba” the great day of the feast. This was when Yeshua was in the temple and said; “whoever comes to me from him will flow rivers of living water” The priests at that time poured out near the altar water and wine, as Yeshua poured out his blood mixed with water on the cross, when the Roman soldier stuck a spear in his side. During this festival was when Solomon dedicated the temple.
    On the 8th day, it is a time to rejoice in the Torah, that we have God’s Word in our midst.
    The Hanukkah lights are lit for 8 days to remind us of the dedication of the first temple, and also to remind us that today we are the temple of YHVH. Our bodies contain the Holy Spirit as the Spirit of God at one time inhabited the Tabernacle and the temple.
    The entire chapter of Leviticus 23 speaks of the “appointed days” set aside to worship and to get right with Him.
    Of course, it is the choice of every believer to either celebrate or not to celebrate these days. Life is all about choices. We can either ignore these days or celebrate these days. We should not judge our brother or sister if he or she chooses not to. We are saved by grace through Yeshua, not through observance of the commandments. However, if we love the LORD we will want to do as He commands in scripture.
    If you want some detailed info on these Holy Days, you can go to www.hebrew4christians.com. When you go to that site, look to the left and under “home” look for and click on “Holidays” and you can get detailed info under the
    “Days of Awe” .

    Shalom Rabbi Ben Avraham
    I was interested to learn, a few nights ago, that on my Dad's side, his Mother's Mother may have been Jewish. I thought they were German, but they may have married into that ethnicity. My Grandmother, among the several languages she spoke, also spoke Yiddish. And her name was Kelm, which may have Jewish connections. They also were from the Polish/Russian countries.

    Regardless, I'm *not* Jewish, and I feel no compulsion to follow the Jewish Law--not even with a Christian interpretation, although I have nothing against those who wish to treat the Jewish holidays *as holiday celebrations.*

    While it's interesting to note how the various festivals played a role in Hebrew history, and held significance for the coming of Messiah, I agree that the blood under the old covenant was temporary, and cannot hold a candle to the blood shed on Calvary. And so, all my devotion goes to the greatest Jew of all, Jesus Christ. To him I owe everything, and celebrations of an inferior sort simply fall short.

    These festivals do, however, honor the Messiah as previews of what he would do on the cross. His death was the beginning of the Christian "year." His Passover death meant liberation from death itself, and not just from Egypt. The Day of Pentecost represented the initial giving of God's Spirit to the Church, which was just the first fruits of Christian history. It was the beginning of the "Law of Christ."

    Finally, Tabernacles was a celebration of the enshrinement of God's Law in the Promised Land, following the Wilderness Wandering. It begins with the 2nd Coming of Christ, and results in our inheritance of eternal life. It is the completion of the giving of God's Spirit to His people, in fulfillment of the promise given to Abraham that he should inherit all nations. It is the final Harvest.

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    Re: Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yakov View Post
    Are the Jewish High Holy days for all believers?

    The reason that I have begun this writing with “Jewish” High holy days is because this is what most of Christendom believe when the holy days of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkot are mentioned. But in reality, they are “God’s” Holy days for ALL believers. Why do I say this? Let’s keep on reading.

    .....

    Of course, it is the choice of every believer to either celebrate or not to celebrate these days. Life is all about choices. We can either ignore these days or celebrate these days. We should not judge our brother or sister if he or she chooses not to. We are saved by grace through Yeshua, not through observance of the commandments. However, if we love the LORD we will want to do as He commands in scripture.
    If you want some detailed info on these Holy Days, you can go to www.hebrew4christians.com. When you go to that site, look to the left and under “home” look for and click on “Holidays” and you can get detailed info under the
    “Days of Awe” .

    Shalom Rabbi Ben Avraham
    I don't know how else to state this so I propose scripture. Colossians 2:14-16;

    14 "Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
    .....
    16 Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days"


    The "ordinances" that regulate these Holy Days, that were "written" in the Law delivered to Israel, and which SEPARATED Israel from the nations, is
    • taken out of the way
    • is as dead as our Lord was on the Cross

    And if any Christian would return to these Laws, "Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by the law; ye are fallen from grace" (Gal.5:4), and, "... now, after that ye have known God, or rather are known of God, how turn ye again to the weak and beggarly elements, whereunto ye desire again to be in bondage? Ye observe days, and months, and times, and years" (Gal.4:9-10).

  5. #5
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    Re: Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

    Every day for a Christian is a high Holy day with God dwelling in me

    There is no veil
    There is no distance
    "MISSION: To rescue Christians enslaved by manmade religion and to bring them to the freedom of Jesus."

  6. #6
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    Re: Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

    As per Zechariah 14, the festival of Sukkot/Tabernacles will be celebrated by all the nations of the world in the messianic era:

    And it will come to pass that everyone left of the nations who came up against Jerusalem will go up from year to year to prostrate himself to the King, the Lord of Hosts, and to celebrate the festival of Tabernacles.
    "For a small moment have I forsaken you, and with great mercy will I gather you.With a little wrath did I hide My countenance for a moment from you, and with everlasting kindness will I have compassion on you," said your Redeemer, the Lord."..."For the mountains shall depart and the hills totter, but My kindness shall not depart from you, neither shall the covenant of My peace totter," says the Lord, Who has compassion on you.

    Isaiah 54

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    Re: Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

    These holidays sound like how most of us already celebrate Easter, just with Jewish inflections. The verses Walls posted are a good approach to this IMO. Too much emphasis on our outward expressions of faith can minimize the real reason we are distinct from the world, which is the Holy Spirit.
    여러분은 주님 안에서 항상 기뻐하십시오. 내가 다시 말합니다. 기뻐하십시오.
    모든 사람을 너그럽게 대하십시오. 주님께서 오실 날이 가까웠습니다. Philippians 4


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    Re: Are the "Jewish" High Holy days for ALL believers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aviyah View Post
    These holidays sound like how most of us already celebrate Easter, just with Jewish inflections. The verses Walls posted are a good approach to this IMO. Too much emphasis on our outward expressions of faith can minimize the real reason we are distinct from the world, which is the Holy Spirit.
    Well yes--very true. Too much external ritual, mixed with pagan focus, and the plain, original meaning is lost. Easter was an attempt to Christianize paganism. It's a little different, however, with Christians Christianizing Jewish religion. We believe Christianity literally fulfills and validates Judaism. Easter does not validate paganism, but does seek to replace it.

    The important thing is, as you say, the presence of God itself. Any system that is an empty shell is not worth the time. Nothing worse than ritual compromised with partying. The meaning must remain at the center, which is God with Man.

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