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Thread: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

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    PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    A QUICK MIDRASH ON THE BOOK OF ESTHER, SINCE PURIM IS UPON US.


    A long time ago, in a palace called Sushan, in the kingdom of Persia, there was a king named Ahasuerus who had just a little too much to drink, he called for his wife and he called for more wine, and the wine he got but the wife he got not! His wife Vashti refused to come,


    ” Hey, husband, Mr. King, I have my own party, kinda busy now, so, later dude...”


    Wrong response, that cost her job, she got fired! She got “de-queened” But when King Ahasuerus sobered up again when the Manashevitz ran out, he said, “Oi Vey, what have I done?” Did I really fire the queen?” “Yeah,” his counselors said, “and you signed her out of the palace too, can't get her back now... But. You can send out for a replacement queen!”


    ” Welllll, Okkkkeeyy” let's have a beauty contest, the prettiest girl gets to be queen, that'll work”


    So, we know the rest of the story, Esther (Hadasah) the niece of Mordechai becomes queen. This is not by accident, even though YHVH's name is never mentioned, He is still controlling the situation. The Book of Esther reveals YHVH's activity in spite of his name being omitted. He is still there on the scene, behind the scene, controlling all the events; We can even see symbolism in the characters and events.


    Did it just happen that Vashti got fired and the king arranged for a beauty contest? And that of all the pretty women in the kingdom, all virgins, that Hadasah (Esther) was chosen... I would say that YHVH arranged the whole thing...put everything and everyone in its place and in his and her place, for a reason.


    HaSatan is always out to destroy the Jewish people, and this time, he used Haman to try and do it. So, Haman is a type of HaSatan. God places Mordechai at the right place at the right time, in order to learn of two plots, one plot to assassinate the king, the other to murder all the Jews of the provinces controlled by Persia.


    He sends word to his niece, now queen, of the plans, both plans were revealed by Mordechai, to Queen Esther. Now she has to let the king know. But he hasn't sent for her in a month, to go before the king without being summoned is a death penalty, but she prays and fasts and so do the Jews of Shushan area, Since the king loves Esther, He receives her, she touches his scepter, and she invites him to two parties, along with Haman,


    Now Haman already has an attitude against Mordechai since he will not bow before his presence, I think YHVH has a bit of a sense of humor, Haman rides on a horse and looks down at the people under him, and everyone bows before him in homage, except Mordechai. Now, The king orders Mordechai to ride a horse, wear a crown, and royal apparel, while Haman is below him and has to look up! Interesting change of events.


    Haman's plot to have the Jews killed is revealed, the king is wroth, orders Haman to be hanged on the same gallows (75 feet high) that he meant for Mordechai. That was one big and tall neck-stretcher! Haman probably grew a few more inches in a matter of seconds in that fall from “heaven to earth” by a rope. Remind you of someone who was cast down from “the heavens to earth?” a few thousand years ago?


    The Jews defended themselves on the 13th day of Adar, which was today, March 20th! And won the battle, they also collected the “spoils of war” which was a custom back then, and still is in some parts. To the victor go the spoils, like weapons, money, combat equipment, etc., that the enemy used.


    Mordechai, who became a leader under the king much as Pharaoh appointed Yosef as Vizor, appointed the days 14h and 15th of Adar as two days to remember, and we should also remember the 13th as well, the day that the Jews gained victory over their enemies. This year, 2019, they are March 20, 21st and 22nd.


    The King and Esther can symbolize YHVH and mankind, the only way to gain access to our Heavenly Father is through YESHUA, the scepter can symbolize YESHUA, we can only come by invitation, the Father invites us to come to him THROUGH YESHUA, if the scepter is not extended, you don't come, without the scepter, death is for sure,


    We can look at it this way too. Esther can symbolize YESHUA, and the king, our Heavenly Father, As Esther intervened before the king for her people, so does YESHUA intervene before the Father on our behalf.


    Esther, the bride, and wife, can also symbolize all believers, the “Kehilah” of Messiah. And the king, Messiah Yeshua. As King Ahasuerus loved Esther so much that he listened to her petition, so Yeshua loves his bride and soon to be wife, so much that he gave up his life for us all, on Calvary's cross. His bride consists of all believers everywhere. He listens to our petitions, our prayers, and he responds according to his perfect will.


    Satan was defeated again back then. Never bow the head or knee to HaSatan, as Mordechai resisted Haman, so should all believers resist the temptations that are thrown at us by the father of lies. So, let us rejoice this day and tomorrow, remembering the Feast of Lots, (Purim) which fell upon the 13th day of Adar, a day meant for destruction of the Jewish people, but death and destruction were changed to continued life and prosperity for “b'nei Israel” and so we continue to exist, and will always exist, and be the apple of our Savior's eye, for all eternity.



    THE BOOK OF ESTHER - Midrash and Symbolism


    The reading of the book of Esther during the time of Purim is customary, and when one reads the entire book, one will notice that the name of God is never mentioned. We do not see “LORD” or God nor even in the Hebrew is the name “Adonai” or “Elohim” written in the entire book, yet the intervention of Adonai is clearly there. There is also symbolism in the characters that play a part in this true Biblical drama of suspense and final victory.


    The characters are; King Ahasuerus, king of Persia, Vashti, Esther, Mordechai, Haman. There are more characters but these are the main players. As we know from the reading, the king throws a six-month party, gets drunk, invites queen Vashti to his part of the party to show her to his guests, she refuses, she is deposed, she is replaced by Esther who becomes the new queen of Persia.


    The first symbolism that we could see is this; The king could be a picture of Yeshua who receives his bride (Esther) He extends the scepter to receive her, and when we accept Yeshua as Messiah and LORD in our lives, we are joining in the “body of the bride”. (of course, we would never imagine our Messiah as a drunkard, that would be the exception).


    The second symbolism could be that the king symbolizes the master. The master calls for his servant (Vashti) she refuses the master’s request to come. The master then turns to the second servant, (Esther) and she accepts the follow the master (in marriage). Which one of the servants do we identify ourselves with? Of course, with Esther. We must be careful never to say “No” to our LORD, Messiah, and Master, lest we be replaced by someone else who will heed the calling.


    Saying “No” to Yeshua in serving him in ways of his calling could result in lost blessings, being replaced by someone else who WILL obey.


    The third symbolism can be in the character of Mordechai. He acted as Esther’s counselor and advisor. He supported her in all ways. We, as the body of Messiah, need counselors in ministry, those that will support us, and guide us. There are no “Lone Rangers” in ministry. As the Apostle Paul had Barnabas, we also need our “Mordechai” who will advise us and give us that “push” when we need to be “pushed” a bit.


    The fourth symbolism is that of Haman, who of course, as we can all imagine, symbolizes Satan, who wishes to destroy the Jewish people. Esther and the King team up to destroy Haman. She invites the king and Haman to her party, and Haman gets stretched out on the end of the rope.


    Yeshua destroyed the curse of sin and death whose author is Satan. Satan was conquered at Calvary’s cross. The body of Messiah, his beloved bride and “queen” is also involved because when we direct a person to accept Yeshua as Messiah and LORD, being “Born-again” (John 3:3) we are taking another soul from the grasp of HaSatan. We are pulling the “rope” that hangs Haman. And as the word “Purim” starts with the letter “P” (Pey) and ends with the letter “M” (mem) we are to use our “mouth” (Pey) to share this story with the “masses of humanity” (mem) to all who would listen and understand.





    Rabbi Ben Avraham

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    I realize that there is great symbolism in the Bible, but the student of the Bile cannot get past these facts.
    1. God, Who inspires the author of Esther, will not name His Name. Why? The small remnant that returned to rebuild the Temple are notable connected with God's Name
    2. God has moved Cyrus, and later Darius and Artaxerxes to free the Jews to return and build the Temple and later Jerusalem. What was Esther, Mordecai and the hoard of Jews (ca. 97% of them) still doing in Mesopotamia/Persia?
    3. The Lord instituted a number of Feasts in the Law of Moses. Why did Mordecai and company add to this by declaring a binding feast outside of the Law?
    4. If the whole of Judah had left for Jerusalem instead of only 2.5% of them, would not they have been free of Haman the Agagite grandson of the Amalekite Agag?
    5. Did Esther compromise the Law to gain her favors? Daniel did not, neither did Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego

    It seems to me that this Book, far from symbolism of Christ and the Bride, is a sad record of those who do not care for God's plan, God's Land, God's Temple, God's sovereign providence of kings benign to Israel's plight and of inserting man's traditions into God's Word.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Good study Yacov.

    I have also studied Esther in the past; in relation to the writings of Ezekiel related to the unwalled cities, the attempted purging of the Jews throughout the kingom by Hamon the Gogite, in the valley of HamonGog.

    Very interesting stuff, considering Esther never specifically mentions 'God' in the book.

    Not alot of folks have noticed that.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by Walls View Post
    I
    It seems to me that this Book, far from symbolism of Christ and the Bride, is a sad record of those who do not care for God's plan, God's Land, God's Temple, God's sovereign providence of kings benign to Israel's plight and of inserting man's traditions into God's Word.
    I guess celebrating the 4th of July for Americans is out of the question for you also?
    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by Walls View Post
    It seems to me that this Book, far from symbolism of Christ and the Bride, is a sad record of those who do not care for God's plan, God's Land, God's Temple, God's sovereign providence of kings benign to Israel's plight and of inserting man's traditions into God's Word.
    So you're basically making the point that Esther shouldn't even be in the bible. That's the first time I've ever heard anybody say that.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Came across this article quite by chance, and I enjoyed it a lot. Perhaps some of you will, too-

    What Does the Purim Story Have to Do with Righteous Gentiles?

    Precious little, you would think. But actually, thanks to one figure in the story, quite a lot.

    Andrew Koss

    The main event of the upcoming holiday of Purim is the reading of the Megillah, which tells the story of how brave Esther and pious Mordecai saved Persian Jewry from the genocidal schemes of the wicked Haman. In the Ashkenazi tradition, the public reading of the scroll is followed by reciting a poem whose unknown author lived no later than the 11th century. The concluding lines are usually sung to an up-beat tune:

    Cursed is Haman, who sought to destroy me;
    Blessed is Mordecai the Jew.
    Cursed is Zeresh, wife of my tormentor;
    Blessed is Esther, who protected me—
    And also Harbonah, who is to be remembered for the good!

    The reference to Haman’s wife Zeresh, who plays only a supporting role in the book of Esther, can be chalked up to poetic license—a female villain in counterpoint to the story’s heroine. But what of Harbonah, a decidedly minor character mentioned only once in the entire book, and whose appearance in the poem’s final verse breaks the stanza’s metrical form and rhyme scheme? And what of the epithet “to be remembered for the good”?

    In the Megillah itself, Harbonah comes onstage near the story’s denouement, just after Queen Esther has exposed to her husband the nefarious plan of his vizier Haman:

    And Harbonah, one of the chamberlains [sarisim], said before the king, Behold also, the gallows fifty cubits high, which Haman had made for Mordecai, who had spoken good for the king, standeth in the house of Haman. Then the king said, Hang him thereon.

    In other words, Harbonah is there to make sure that Haman gets his proper comeuppance by being hanged on the gallows built for his nemesis Mordecai. As for his epithet, our anonymous poet’s authority is Rabbi Pinḥas, who states in the Jerusalem Talmud that on Purim one should say, “Harbonah, to be remembered for the good.”

    Harbonah’s intervention, even if rather cautiously targeted at one who had already earned the king’s disfavor, was certainly commendable. But the question remains: why this special treatment? A closer look may reveal a facet of the Purim story with enduring relevance.

    Let's proceed by way of another biblical text, one not usually associated with Purim but chanted in the synagogue just before the holiday begins. The passage—Isaiah 55:6-56:8—is the prophetic reading for afternoon services on fast days, including the Fast of Esther that normally falls on the eve of Purim. Here are the crucial verses:

    Neither let the son of the alien, that hath joined himself to the Lord, speak, saying, The Lord hath utterly separated me from His people; neither let the eunuch say, Behold, I am a dried-up tree.
    For thus saith the Lord unto the eunuchs that keep My Sabbaths, and choose the things that please Me, and hold fast to My covenant;
    Even unto them will I give in Mine house and within My walls a place and a name better than of sons and of daughters: I will give them an everlasting name, that shall not be cut off.

    Here the prophet Isaiah is offering reassurance to two classes of people. The first is the nekhar, or alien, a word that in this context clearly refers to a Gentile (as it does elsewhere in the Bible). While such a person—the reference may be to a convert or to one taking on the intermediate status of a God-fearing non-Jew—might fear that not being born a Jew places an insurmountable barrier between him and God, the prophet assures him to the contrary.

    The second is the saris, usually translated as “eunuch,” whose despair comes from childlessness. To him the prophet promises “a place and a name,” in Hebrew yad va-shem—a phrase, sometimes rendered “everlasting memorial,” that gives its name to Israel’s Holocaust memorial museum. Don’t worry, Isaiah is saying, you may think that your lack of progeny means that your name won’t live on. But God promises it will live on forever.

    What has this to do with Harbonah? He is both a Gentile and a saris, although the word as it appears in the book of Esther is usually translated as “chamberlain” since in many ancient Middle Eastern societies eunuchs were employed as court functionaries. Whether or not the sarisim of Esther were of the castrated sort, it’s worth a guess that Isaiah’s message would apply doubly to the only Gentile character in the book of Esther who comes across in an unambiguously positive light. Setting aside the supervillain Haman, consider only the emperor Ahasuerus, understood variously as a well-meaning dupe, a drunk, and a quasi-villain who casually gives the go-ahead to Haman’s plan for genocide and reconsiders only on discovering that his queen is among its prospective victims. The book’s other Gentiles are generally neutral characters.

    Harbonah, by contrast, speaks out just once but does so to stand up for the Jews, motivated, it would seem, by a sense of justice: the punishment devised for Mordecai should be meted out to the deviser Haman. And this brings us back to the reading from Isaiah and the promised reward of non-Jews who choose God:

    Also the sons of the alien, that join themselves to the Lord, to serve Him, and to love the name of the Lord, to be His servants, every one that keepeth the Sabbath from violating it, and holds fast to My covenant;
    Even them will I bring to My holy mountain, and make them joyful in My house of prayer: their burnt offerings and their sacrifices shall be accepted upon Mine altar; for Mine house shall be called an house of prayer for all people.

    The house here is the Temple, and the mountain the Temple Mount. Although nothing in the book of Esther suggests explicitly that Harbonah joined himself to God or kept the Sabbath, by standing up for God’s people he, too, found himself an “everlasting name.” This is the meaning of the rabbinic phrase “to be remembered for the good,” and the reason it was important to our poet to make room for Harbonah prominently at the end of his poem.

    It was Yad Vashem—the institution whose name derives from the same passage in Isaiah—that first popularized the term “righteous among the nations” to refer to those Gentiles who rescued Jews during the Holocaust, often risking their own lives in the process. While Isaiah apparently had in mind Gentiles who related to God in a righteous way, and not necessarily through their relations specifically with Jews, the singling-out of Harbonah focuses our attention on those who exert themselves to protect Jews. In commemorating such people, Yad Vashem has given them, too, “a place and a name” in the original sense of that phrase.

    The book of Esther, it has often been remarked, is a quintessentially diasporic text. It takes place entirely outside the Land of Israel and deals with themes that are staples of the diaspora experience: anti-Semitism, Jews passing as Gentiles, the need for a special kind of politics, the issue of Jews who obtain influence in non-Jewish societies, and so forth. The phenomenon of the righteous Gentile is part of this experience, too.

    And here is where the enduring relevance of the Harbonah story comes in. Just a few weeks ago, for instance, the vexed question of Polish collaboration in the Holocaust was once again in the headlines, the subject of a diplomatic fracas between Jerusalem and Warsaw. Surely the recent efforts by the Polish government to distort or cover up the historical record are deserving of sharp criticism, and the hundreds if not thousands of Poles who aided in the extermination of the Jews deserve ignominy no less than did the thousands of ancient Persian subjects who volunteered to help Haman.

    But the exhortations of both Isaiah and the Jerusalem Talmud would also seem to apply, collectively and individually, to the thousands of Poles who saved Jews, often exposing themselves to considerably greater danger than those who acted similarly in Nazi-occupied Western Europe. Nor is the message of these passages limited to acts of heroic selflessness during the Shoah. Think, for instance, of Zidan Saif, the Druze policeman who gave his life defending a Jerusalem synagogue against terrorists in 2014—or, in the realm of power politics, of those many Gentiles, from Arthur Balfour to Harry Truman to Daniel P. Moynihan, who at decisive moments in history have spoken up for the Jewish people and the Jewish state.

    To be sure, the names of these latter figures would be remembered regardless of what good they have done the Jews. Part of the message of singling out Harbonah, then, lies precisely in the fact that unlike them, he is a minor character. Today, not everyone who writes a small check to Christians United for Israel, or shares an article on Facebook criticizing the anti-Semitism of Ilhan Omar or Jeremy Corbyn, can be known to posterity. But in the midst of the Purim celebrations of Jewish redemption, they, too, deserve to be remembered for the good.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fenris View Post
    So you're basically making the point that Esther shouldn't even be in the bible. That's the first time I've ever heard anybody say that.
    Since Hanukah was celebrated by Jesus, and we Christians believe He is God, so I guess it is ok to have traditions and feasts outside of the Torah appointed feasts....



    “It is the mystery of the hidden miracle of survival in the face of overwhelming destruction. Our refusal to surrender has turned our story into one long, unending Purim tale.” Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo
    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

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    Cool Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by David Taylor View Post
    Good study Yacov.

    I have also studied Esther in the past; in relation to the writings of Ezekiel related to the unwalled cities, the attempted purging of the Jews throughout the kingom by Hamon the Gogite, in the valley of HamonGog.

    Very interesting stuff, considering Esther never specifically mentions 'God' in the book.

    Not alot of folks have noticed that.
    Happy Purim everybody!

    PURIM
    2019 date Sunset, 20 March – nightfall, 21 March.
    John 15:17 "These things I command you, that ye love one another."

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    yes...HAPPY PURIM!!

    Commentary by Rabbi Sacks:

    If you’re driving through a Jewish area this [Purim], don’t be surprised if you see lots of children in the streets wearing fancy dress and masks, or people going from house to house delivering presents of food and drink. The reason is that we’ll be celebrating Purim, the most boisterous and exuberant of all Jewish festivals.

    Which is actually very odd indeed, because Purim commemorates the story told in the book of Esther, when Haman, a senior official of the Persian Empire, persuaded the king to issue a decree to annihilate all Jews, young and old, men, women and children, on one day: a warrant for genocide. Thanks to the vigilance of Mordechai and the courage of Esther, the decree was not carried out, and ever since, we’ve celebrated by reading the story, having parties, giving to the poor and sharing gifts of food with friends.

    I used to be very puzzled by this. Why such exhilaration at merely surviving a tragedy that was only narrowly averted? Relief, I can understand. But to turn the day into a carnival? Just because we’re still here to tell the story?

    Slowly, though, I began to understand how much pain there has been in Jewish history, how many massacres and pogroms throughout the ages. Jews had to learn how to live with the past without being traumatised by it. So they turned the day when they faced and then escaped the greatest danger of all into a festival of unconfined joy, a day of dressing up and drinking a bit too much, to exorcise the fear, live through it and beyond it, and then come back to life, unhaunted by the ghosts of memory.

    Purim is the Jewish answer to one of the great questions of history: how do you live with the past without being held captive by the past? Ours is a religion of memory, because if you forget the past, you’ll find yourself repeating it. Yet it’s also a future oriented faith. To be a Jew is to answer the question, Has the messiah come?, with the words, Not yet.

    There are so many parts of the world today where ancient grievances are still being played out, as if history were a hamster wheel in which however fast we run we find ourselves back where we started. Purim is a way of saying, remember the past, but then look at the children, celebrate with them, and for their sake, put the past behind you and build a better future.
    yes...HAPPY PURIM!!

    Commentary by Rabbi Sacks:

    If you’re driving through a Jewish area this [Purim], don’t be surprised if you see lots of children in the streets wearing fancy dress and masks, or people going from house to house delivering presents of food and drink. The reason is that we’ll be celebrating Purim, the most boisterous and exuberant of all Jewish festivals.

    Which is actually very odd indeed, because Purim commemorates the story told in the book of Esther, when Haman, a senior official of the Persian Empire, persuaded the king to issue a decree to annihilate all Jews, young and old, men, women and children, on one day: a warrant for genocide. Thanks to the vigilance of Mordechai and the courage of Esther, the decree was not carried out, and ever since, we’ve celebrated by reading the story, having parties, giving to the poor and sharing gifts of food with friends.

    I used to be very puzzled by this. Why such exhilaration at merely surviving a tragedy that was only narrowly averted? Relief, I can understand. But to turn the day into a carnival? Just because we’re still here to tell the story?

    Slowly, though, I began to understand how much pain there has been in Jewish history, how many massacres and pogroms throughout the ages. Jews had to learn how to live with the past without being traumatised by it. So they turned the day when they faced and then escaped the greatest danger of all into a festival of unconfined joy, a day of dressing up and drinking a bit too much, to exorcise the fear, live through it and beyond it, and then come back to life, unhaunted by the ghosts of memory.

    Purim is the Jewish answer to one of the great questions of history: how do you live with the past without being held captive by the past? Ours is a religion of memory, because if you forget the past, you’ll find yourself repeating it. Yet it’s also a future oriented faith. To be a Jew is to answer the question, Has the messiah come?, with the words, Not yet.

    There are so many parts of the world today where ancient grievances are still being played out, as if history were a hamster wheel in which however fast we run we find ourselves back where we started. Purim is a way of saying, remember the past, but then look at the children, celebrate with them, and for their sake, put the past behind you and build a better future.
    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by keck553 View Post
    I guess celebrating the 4th of July for Americans is out of the question for you also?
    No. Americans do not attach God's name to it. But what think ye of my arguments?

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fenris View Post
    So you're basically making the point that Esther shouldn't even be in the bible. That's the first time I've ever heard anybody say that.
    On the contrary. What a testimony to Israel's indifference to their Land, City and Temple. Here they decide to stay in the Land where they must serve other gods when Jehovah declared their captivity over. And then when Jehovah saves them they promptly declare an new feast uncalled for by the Lord. More the tragedy when one thinks that part of the reason for their captivity was that they did not give their Land its Sabbaths - a thing called for by their God. And we Christians are no better. You probably don't frequent Christian activities, but if you did you would find them involved in all manner of activities not found in scripture. What a lesson for us all. It is to me one of the most important books of the Old Testament.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by Walls View Post
    No. Americans do not attach God's name to it. But what think ye of my arguments?
    Seriously?

    July 4 is a religious holiday. For this insight, thank John F. Kennedy.

    On July 4, 1946, Kennedy — then 29 years old, the Democratic nominee for a Massachusetts Congressional seat, and still a lieutenant in the Navy Reserve — was the featured speaker at the City of Boston’s Independence Day celebration. He spoke at Faneuil Hall, the red-brick building where long ago the colonists had gathered to protest taxes imposed by King George III and his Parliament.

    Kennedy began by talking not about taxes, or about the British, or about the consent of the governed, but about religion. “The informing spirit of the American character has always been a deep religious sense. Throughout the years, down to the present, a devotion to fundamental religious principles has characterized American though and action,” he said.

    “For anyone wondering what this had to do with Independence Day, Kennedy made the connection explicit. “Our government was founded on the essential religious idea of integrity of the individual. It was this religious sense which inspired the authors of the Declaration of Independence: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights.’”

    http://time.com/2951223/fourth-of-ju...igion-america/
    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by Walls View Post
    No. Americans do not attach God's name to it. But what think ye of my arguments?
    Apply them to Jesus celebrating Hanukkah
    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

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    Re: PURIM, What's it all about? (Book of Esther)

    Quote Originally Posted by keck553 View Post
    Apply them to Jesus celebrating Hanukkah
    If this is your answer then I may take it that our brother Keck553 agrees with, and fully supports;
    • The captives of Judah disregarding the the end of their God-ordained captivity
    • The captives of Judah refusing to return to their Land
    • The captives of Judah agreeing to stay in a strange Land
    • The captives of Judah not wanting to occupy the Land that God gave them and opened the way for them to return
    • The captives of Judah not wanting to build God's House that He might have a place for His Name on earth
    • The captives of Judah not wanting to rebuild the "City of the Great King"
    • The captives of Judah not being connected with God's Name
    • A virgin of Israel voluntarily joining the harem of a foreign king
    • A virgin of Israel seeking relief for her people from a heathen king and not Jehovah
    • Judaeans, subjects of the Law of Moses, and in captivity for breaking that Law, introducing a Feast that God did not command

    If however, your refusal to deal with my arguments is for another reason, we will be glad to her it. It just seems strange that a Christian, who has been given two opportunities to show why the rebellious behavior of Judah is valid, would condone such behavior from God's people.

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